State of Connecticut Home Follow Us on FacebookFollow Us on TwitterFollow Us on Flickr
Connecticut Department of Labor Home Connecticut Economic Digest Home
Home About Publications FAQ Glossary Contact
Labor Market Information - The Connecticut Economic Digest - Index of Articles
  The Connecticut Economic Digest - Index of Articles Last Updated: November 1, 2017
Published monthly since 1996 by the Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research and the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development.

The Connecticut Economic Digest's purpose is to regularly provide users with a comprehensive source for the most current, up-to-date data available on the workforce and economy of the state, within perspectives of the region and nation.

Every month the Connecticut Economic Digest provides the most current economic data available for Connecticut. Decision-makers from many arenas are better informed because the Digest makes it possible to follow the trends and understand the status of economic forces that influence Connecticut's labor markets. We are pleased to continue providing information that is useful in making decisions, setting plans, and engaging in informed conversation.

Articles from the Connecticut Economic Digest may be reprinted if the source is credited. Please send copies of the reprinted material to the Managing Editor. The views expressed by the authors are theirs alone and may not reflect those of the DOL or Department of Economic and Community Development. Managing Editor: Jungmin Charles Joo.

For further information, call the Office of Research at 860-263-6290 or e-mail to dol.econdigest@po.state.ct.us.

Become a Connecticut Economic Digest subscriber!
1 Send message addressed to: listserv@list.ct.gov with the following in the body of the message. (leave subject blank)
2 SUBSCRIBE DOL-CTEconomicDigest your_name (type in your name where it says your_name).

To Unsubscribe from Connecticut Economic Digest list.
1 Compose an e-mail to listserv@list.ct.gov from same email account when subscribing to DOL-CTEconomicDigest.
2 Leave the subject line blank and in the body of the message type: Signoff DOL-CTEconomicDigest. Click send.

Connecticut Digest Article Topics
Reference over 200 articles focusing on
Connecticut's economic climate including:
Adobe Reader is the global standard for electronic document sharing. Use Adobe Reader to view, search, digitally sign, verify, print, and collaborate on Adobe PDF files. Download Acrobat Reader.
  • Is Connecticut Losing Jobs to Other States?  November 2017 (353K) Pg.1-5
    By Andy Condon Ph.D., Director of Research, Department of Labor, Andrew.Condon@ct.gov

    Rightly or wrongly, Connecticut's job growth performance is often talked about in the context of “winning” or “losing” to other parts of the country. This article uses the location quotient measure to begin to address this issue by using national Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) data to measure relative job growth from and to Connecticut over time. According to the US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics, location quotients are ratios that allow an area's distribution of employment by industry, ownership, and size class to be compared to a reference area's distribution. download article only ] 

  • State Economic Indexes (SEI), 2010-2016.  October 2017 (375K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, and Dana Placzek, Office of Research Department of Labor

    Connecticut ranked 32nd out of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) in the State Economic Indexes (SEI) in 2016, moving up from the 39th position in 2015. In fact, last year's overall economic performance was the best in terms of the ranking in six years. Colorado, once again, ranked first in the nation with the highest index last year (145.3), while Wyoming came in last (102.6). Our state's index of 120.5 was below the nationwide value of 124.5.

    SEI: Methodology
    Applying the same components and methodology of the Connecticut Town Economic Indexes (See September 2017 issue), the Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research also developed the State Economic Indexes, an annual composite index of each of the 50 states and DC. With recently available annual average data from the Quarterly Census Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, along with the revised annual average unemployment rate from Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS), annual SEI is reestimated for the 2010-2016 period.

    These indexes provide a measure of the overall economic strength of each state that can be compared and ranked. Four annual average state economic indicators were used as components: 1. the number of the total covered business establishments, 2. total covered employment, 3. real covered wages, and 4. the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI): 2013-2016.  September 2017 (375K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, and Dana Placzek, Office of Research Department of Labor

    The Connecticut Town Economic Index showed the state's cities and towns experienced further economic improvement in 2016, though at a slower pace than in 2015.

    CTEI: Methodology: The CTEI was introduced two years ago and is being released annually. The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in the state. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, inflation-adjusted covered wages, and the unemployment rate.

    Establishments are the physical work units located in the municipality. Employment is the number of employees on payroll in the establishments that are located in the town. Wages are the aggregate payroll pay divided by the total average employment. These three measures come from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program and include all those who are covered under the unemployment insurance law, thus capturing nearly 100 percent of all the employees in each town. download article only ] 

  • Covered Employment and Wages: A 2016 Annual Review.  August 2017 (264K) Pg.1-5
    By Jonathan Kuchta, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Jonathan.Kuchta@ct.gov

    The number of jobs covered by Connecticut Unemployment Insurance (UI) increased by 0.2 percent during 2016, according to most recent data published from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. This increase continues the trend started in 2011. Total private industry employment, constituting 86.1 percent of the state's employment total, increased by 0.5 percent. Total government employment decreased by 1.4 percent year-over-year.

    Average annual wages for all Connecticut jobs increased by 0.5 percent to $65,869, much like in 2015. In 2016, private sector wages increased by 0.4 percent to $66,579; government wages increased 0.9 percent to $61,458.

    The number of business establishments expanded for the fifth year in a row, with a new total of 117,337, an increase of 0.9 percent over 2015. Total private establishments represented the entirety of the increase, reaching 113,944 in 2016. Government worksites decreased 0.9 percent in the state, from 3,425 in 2015 to 3,393 in 2016. [ download article only ]

  • Robots in the Workplace: Threat or Asset?  July 2017 (337K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    The latest breakthroughs in robotics and artificial intelligence have awakened fears that technological advances will lead to a large decrease in the overall level of employment and widespread unemployment. While there will be disruptions, and many occupations are at high risk of computerization over the next decade or two, the dynamic labor market continues to create opportunities for workers with the right skills and education. .  [ download article only ] 

  • Anchor Institutions and the Innovation Economy.  June 2017 (336K) Pg.1,2,5
    By Al Sylvestre, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Alan.Sylvestre@ct.gov

    Anchor Institution Characteristics
    Hospitals and institutions of higher learning deploying their considerable resources to promote neighborhood revitalization through economic development are known as anchor institutions. Often acting in concert with nonprofit and public agencies, anchor institutions create opportunities for home ownership among low- and moderate-income households as well as supporting educational and apprenticeship programs for disadvantaged youth to prepare them for gainful employment.

    This article offers a brief look at two prominent Connecticut anchor institutions and others throughout the country as examples of how institutional self-interest and philanthropy have successfully combined to drive the revitalization of the communities that host these institutions. If these institutions continue to be nourished by capital, innovation, and the commitment of community and social resource providers, the possibility remains that impoverished communities can flourish through the perseverance of individuals and institutions that see potential in their neighborhoods. download article only ] 

  • Annual Unemployment Rate by Town, 2012-2016.  June 2017 (336K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    By looking at the unemployment rates, we can see that Connecticut has experienced six years of economic recovery. Unemployment rates come from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For a brief explanation of the methodology of LAUS, see "Labor Force Estimates" on page 23. In the June 2016 Digest, 2011-2015 annual average town unemployment rate estimates were published. This year, revised 2012-2016 data are analyzed. download article only ] 

  • Short-Term Employment Projections Through 2018.  May 2017 (355K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor and Patrick.Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor

    Each year, the Office of Research at the Connecticut Department of Labor produces short-term employment projections by industry and occupation. The projections are based on a careful analysis of the Connecticut economy and labor market.

    Current Situation
    March of 2010 was the first month of payroll job growth after the great recession. Seven years later the Connecticut economy has regained 91,200 jobs or 77% of the 119,100 lost during the "great recession" as of March 2017. Overall employment growth has been dampened by the government sector which is down 14,000 jobs since February 2010. Private sector employment has fared significantly better having recovered 94% of the jobs lost during the downturn. [ download article only ] 

  • A New Look at Earnings Inequality. April 2017 (326K) Pg.4-5.
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    There is a great deal of literature documenting the increase in income inequality in the United States from the mid-1970s to the present. Data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) show similar trends. In a recent presentation, Dr. James R. Spletzer of the U.S. Census Bureau reviewed this data and presented new findings using data from the Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD).[ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Economic Recovery Continues in 2016.  March 2017 (346K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Although still yet to fully recover from the latest employment downturn, the Connecticut economy continued to improve in 2016, albeit at a slower pace. The total nonfarm employment increased for the sixth year. The unemployment rate fell for six consecutive years. Real personal income rose for the third year. Other economic indicators, however, were somewhat mixed.

    Nonfarm Employment
    After our annual revision, Connecticut gained (based on annual average, not seasonally adjusted data) 5,000 jobs (+0.3%) in 2016, which was fewer than the 12,600 jobs (+0.8%) in 2015. Last year's employment recovery was the slowest in the last six years. Nationally, employment grew faster at 2.1% in 2015 and 1.7% in 2016. On a monthly seasonally adjusted basis through January 2017, Connecticut has now recovered 70% (+83,600) of the total nonfarm jobs lost during the March 2008-February 2010 employment recession (-119,100), while the total private sector regained 92% of its job loss. By contrast, the nation has not only fully regained all of the jobs lost during its January 2008-February 2010 employment downturn, but has also added 82% more jobs by January his year.. download article only ] 

  • The 2017 Economic Outlook.  January 2017 (351K) Pg.1-5
    By Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    An analysis of recent data and trends indicates positive - albeit modest - growth in 2017 for the U.S. and Connecticut economies.

    The Nation - The outlook for the U.S. economy in 2017 remains relatively optimistic based on technical data. The U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP), except for Q1-2011 and Q1-2014 (when it slipped 1.5% and 0.9%, respectively), has now grown for seven years since the "Great Recession" ended in Q2-2009. Real Gross Domestic Product (RGDP), or the constant dollar value of all goods and services produced by labor and capital located in the U.S., since Q2-2009 has averaged a 2.1% annual increase from the preceding quarter (Figure 1). After growing 2.5% in 2010, 1.6% in 2011, 2.2% in 2012, 1.7% in 2013, 2.4% in 2014, 2.6% in 2015, and an estimated 3.2% in Q3-2016, RGDP growth near 2.5% is likely in 2017. Major economic forecasters, including HIS Global Insight, The Conference Board, and the OECD, forecast that U.S. Real GDP will grow between 2 to 2 1/2% in 2017. Their outlook for 2016 was 3.4%, a little less than the previous year's forecast of 3.7%. The National Association of Business Economists (NABE) median 2017 outlook calls for 2.3% average annual growth. [ download article only ] 

  • Introducing the State Economic Indexes (SEI).  November 2016 (319K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    If the 50 states and the District of Columbia, Connecticut ranked 38th in the State Economic Indexes (SEI) in 2015. Our state's index of 118.9 was below the nationwide value of 124.1 (see table on page 2). Over the last five years, Connecticut's overall index performed the worst in 2013, ranking 45th. However, last year was the best since 2011, bringing up the state to 38th position. As the chart on page 3 shows, Colorado ranked first in the nation with the highest index last year (137.9), while New Mexico came in last (107.2). download article only ] 

  • Next Generation Economic Development.  November 2016 (319K) Pg.4
    By Al Sylvestre, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Alan.Sylvestre@ct.gov

    Connecticut is dependent on large employers for jobs and job growth. A significant proportion of private-sector employment is in companies with 500 or more employees. Early this year, based on the premise that Connecticut's economy would benefit from job growth among businesses of all sizes, the Capitol Region Council of Governments convened a panel of experts composed of business and government leaders to generate ideas for nurturing small to medium-size businesses in economic sectors that show promise for bringing more wellpaying jobs to Connecticut. The successful firms described below show that Connecticut has the potential to experience growth in diverse industries. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI): 2010-2015.  October 2016 (404K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI) showed the state's cities and towns experienced further economic improvement in 2015. The CTEI was introduced last year and will be released annually in the October issue. The revised 2011 index values for all 169 cities and towns in the state are available upon request.

    CTEI: Methodology: The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in Connecticut. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, real covered wages, and the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment Rates by Labor Market Area, 1990-July 2016.  October 2016 (404K) Pg.4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    In addition to not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate estimates, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) also produces monthly seasonally adjusted data by major labor market areas (LMAs) for Connecticut, going back to 1990. Because of the one-month lag, these estimates are not published in the Labor Situation or the Connecticut Economic Digest, but they are available upon request. This article looks at the long-term monthly trends of seasonally adjusted unemployment rates of all the LMAs. The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research separately produced seasonally adjusted estimates for small areas (Enfield, Torrington-Northwest, and Danielson-Northeast) so that all areas in the state can be compared and analyzed. Note that because of the recent geographical changes, these small non-BLS LMAs can be seasonally adjusted only back to 2010. download article only ] 

  • Long Term Industry and Occupational Projections: 2014-2024.  September 2016 (354K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, DOL, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov and Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, DOL, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    NATIONAL PROJECTIONS ~ Every two years, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics produces 10 year projections of the U.S. labor force and employment by industry and occupation. The latest projections are for the period 2014 to 2024.

    Labor Force ~ The U.S. labor force is projected to increase by 9.8 million workers from 2014 to 2024 (a 0.6% annualized growth rate) with the 2024 labor force projected to be older and more diverse. The number of workers aged 55 and older is expected to increase by more than 6.7 million (+19.8%) while the number aged 16 to 24 is projected to decrease by 2.8 million (-13.1%) with the largest labor force cohort – those aged 25 to 54 (also known as prime-age workers) up just 3.9 million (+3.9%). As a percent of the labor force, the 16-24 cohort will fall 2.1 percentage points to 14.1% in 2024; increased postsecondary enrollment is a primary cause of this share decrease. [ download article only ] 

  • Covered Employment and Wages: A 2015 Annual Review.  August 2016 (328K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Jonathan Kuchta, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Jonathan.Kuchta@ct.gov

    The number of jobs in Connecticut covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) increased by 0.6 percent during 2015, according to most recent data published from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. This increase continues the trend started back in 2011. Total private industry employment, constituting 85.9 percent of the state's employment total, increased by 0.8 percent. Government employment decreased by 0.6 percent year-over-year. [ download article only ]  

  • Business Formation in Connecticut: 2000-2015.  August 2016 (328K) Pg.4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Secretary of the State's office maintains records of all business entities in the state. From these records, an aggregation of business type and location has produced interesting data on business formation change in Connecticut over time. This information is available publicly from 1980 to 2015 by business entity type and geographically down to town levels. This article examines business formation change from 2000-2015 and shows how recent cyclical factors have impacted business development in the state. [ download article only ]  

  • Labor Force Participation Rate and Employment-Population Ratio, 1976-2016.  June 2016 (402K) Pg.1-2 & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    The Connecticut Economic Digest now publishes the monthly labor force participation rate and employment-population ratio, which are found under the "Unemployment" table on page 6. These two data, produced by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), provide additional perspectives to the unemployment rate data in assessing the current economic condition. This article also looks at their entire historical trends. download article only ] 

  • Annual Town Unemployment Rates, 2011-2015.  June 2016 (402K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    Unemployment rates come from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For a brief explanation of the methodology of LAUS, see "Labor Force Estimates" on page 23. In July 2015 Digest, 2010-2014 annual average town unemployment rate estimates were published. This year, revised 2011-2015 data are analyzed. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Short-Term Employment Outlook to 2017.  May 2016 (347K) Pg.1-5
    By Sarah Pilipaitis, Economist, Department of Labor

    Connecticut is now into its sixth year of recovery from the recession that took its toll on the state from 2008 to 2010. Over the recession, Connecticut lost over 5% of its nonfarm employment, roughly 91,100 jobs based on annual averages. The annual average nonfarm employment reached its peak in 2008 at 1,699,100 jobs. By the time it reached the trough in 2010, the state's employment had fallen to 1,608,000 jobs. The largest losses came from the construction, manufacturing, trade, transportation and utilities, and the professional and business services sectors. Those four sectors alone accounted for 80% of the lost jobs. The lone sector that was able to create jobs during the recession was education and health services, expanding by about 10,000 jobs from the peak to trough years. [ download article only ] 

  • Employment Grew for the Fifth Year.  March 2016 (322K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Although not yet completely recovered from the latest employment recession, 2015 was a year of continued moderate economic growth for Connecticut. For the fifth year in a row, our State's total nonfarm employment grew. The unemployment rate fell for five straight years. Real personal income rose for the second year. The majority of the other economic indicators also showed that our overall economy performed well.

    Nonfarm Employment - After our annual revision, Connecticut gained (based on annual average, not seasonally adjusted data) 12,500 jobs (+0.75%) in 2015, which was slightly more than the 11,400 jobs (+0.69%) in 2014. Nationally, employment grew faster at 1.9% in 2014 and 2.1% in 2015. Connecticut has now recovered 73% (+86,700) of the total nonfarm jobs lost during the March 2008-February 2010 employment recession (-119,100), while the total private sector regained 86% of its job loss. By contrast, the nation has not only fully regained all of the jobs lost during its January 2008-February 2010 employment downturn, but has also added 56% more jobs by January of this year. download article only ] 

  • Economic Status of People with Disabilities.  February 2016 (321K) Pg.1-5
    By Al Sylvestre, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Alan.Sylvestre@ct.gov

    In the eight years since the recession that began in 2008, conditions in Connecticut's labor market continue to improve. As a segment of the working-age population age 16 years and older that constitutes 5% of the work force, among whom 44% are employed full time according to the US Census Bureau's most recent (2014) American Community Survey (ACS), people with disabilities are becoming increasingly visible in the labor market. What follows is a brief examination of this population's economic characteristics as well as some of the programs and services that provide access to opportunities for its members to attach to the labor force and retain employment in response to changes in disability status.. [ download article only ] 

  • The 2016 Economic Outlook.  January 2016 (352K) Pg.1-5
    By Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    This annual outlook article focuses on the economic prospects for the U.S. & Connecticut economies in 2016 through an analysis of a variety of recent data and trends.

    The Nation - The outlook for the U.S. economy in 2016 remains mostly positive. The U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP), except for Q1-2011 and Q1-2014 (when it slipped 1.5% and 0.9%, respectively), has now grown for six years since the "Great Recession" ended in Q2-2009. Real Gross Domestic Product (RGDP), or the constant dollar value of all goods and services produced by labor and capital located in the U.S., since Q2-2009 has averaged a 2.2% annual increase from the preceding quarter (Figure 1). After growing 2.5% in 2010, 1.6% in 2011, 2.2% in 2012, 1.5% in 2013, 2.4% in 2014, and an estimated 2.1% in Q3-2015, RGDP growth near 3.0% is likely in 2016. The New England Economic Partnership (NEEP), based on Moody's Analytics underlying macroeconomic forecast, sees RGDP growth at 3.4% in 2016, a little less than last year's forecast of 3.7%. The National Association of Business Economists (NABE) outlook panel consensus is, on an average annual basis, 2.7% in 2016, "a small downgrade compared to the previous survey's forecast [of 2.9%] for next year." [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's so-called Misery Index Falling as of Late.  November 2015 (234K) Pg.1-3
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, DOL Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov

    A straight forward Misery Index was developed in the 1960's by Yale economist Arthur Okun, who is primarily known for formulating Okun's Law – a perceived inverse relationship between a country's unemployment rate and its national output – gross domestic product (GDP). As a nation's unemployment rate declined, Okun's Law inferred that a country's gross product/output increased with some degree of regularity, and/or vice versa. This fundamental supposition of Okun's Law has held up pretty well over time. Okun's Misery Index, aptly an economic indicator that similarly is utilizing the unemployment rate (seasonally adjusted), is essentially the unemployment rate added to the annualized inflation rate (UR+CPI U annualized). These are two statistics our federal/state cooperating partner, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, produces on a monthly basis. The Office of Research shares in the development of the state's unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Alternative Measures of Labor Underutilization in Connecticut, 2003-2014.  November 2015 (183K) Pg.4-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo and Sarah Pilipaitis, Department of Labor

    In addition to the official unemployment rate, the Connecticut Economic Digest has been publishing the "U-6 rate" each quarter on page 6 under the "Unemployment" table. As introduced in the February 2010 issue (page 3), there are six alternative measures of labor underutilization produced by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), of which U-6 is the broadest measure, capturing not only the "official" unemployed, but also workers employed part-time for economic reasons, and those marginally attached to the labor force. download article only ] 

  • Introducing the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI).  October 2015 (350K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in Connecticut. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, real covered wages, and the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Job Vacancy Survey.  September 2015 (371K) Pg.1-5
    By Andy Condon Ph.D., Director of Research, Department of Labor, Andrew.Condon@ct.gov

    In 2014, the Connecticut Department of Labor’s Office of Research, in partnership with the Office of Workforce Competitiveness, conducted a survey of Connecticut employers designed to estimate hiring demand and job vacancy characteristics by industry and occupation.

    Survey Sample - Information was gathered through the survey of a stratified sample of 10,300 firms in five Labor Market Areas. Firms excluded from the sampling process include Government entities and businesses with no employees. The sample was stratified by industry “supersector,” Labor Market Area and firm employment size. [ download article only ]  

  • Covered Employment and Wages: A 2014 Annual Review.  August 2015 (345K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Jonathan Kuchta, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Jonathan.Kuchta@ct.gov

    The number of workers in Connecticut covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) increased by 0.8 percent during 2014, according to most recent data published from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. This increase continues the trend started back in 2011. Total private industry employment, constituting 85.7 percent of the State's covered employment total, increased by 0.9 percent. Government employment increased by 0.3 percent year-over-year. [ download article only ]  

  • Annual Town Unemployment Rates, 2010-2014.  July 2015 (338K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Unemployment rate data are from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Recently LAUS underwent a major revision back to 2010. download article only ] 

  • Examining Education, Incomes, and the "Skills Gap".  June 2015 (280K) Pg.1-3, 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    While the unemployment rate has dropped sharply over the past few years, it remains higher than it was before the "great recession" began. On the other hand, the number and rate of job openings are higher than their prerecession levels. In March, there were five million job openings nationally despite an unemployment rate of 5.4%, a percentage point higher than prevailed in 2006 and 2007. Despite the pool of unemployed job-seekers, some business groups report that their members are having difficulty hiring employees with the skills and experience they are seeking. This has led some to conclude that there is a gap between the skills available in the labor force and the needs of employers. [ download article only ] 

  • A Review of 2004-2014 Employment Projections.  June 2015 (280K) Pg.4
    By Michael Fitzgerald, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Michael.Fitzgerald@ct.gov

    It will be years—not in my time—before a woman will become Prime Minister." That's a quote made by Margaret Thatcher in 1969, ten years before she took over as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in 1979. In other words, projections—especially 10 years ahead of time—are difficult. Every two years, the Office of Research at the Connecticut Department of Labor creates 10-year employment projections for the state. Now that employment statistics for 2014 have been released, we are going to take a look at the 2004-2014 projections and see how well the projections fared. Statewide numbers for the Major Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) groupings and Occupation Employment Statistics data from 2014 will be what is focused on. There are a couple of things to bear in mind when looking at the original projections. [ download article only ] 

  • The Economic Impact of Tourism in Connecticut. May 2015 (367K) Pg.1-5
    Tourism Economics - Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development

    Tourism is an important economic engine in Connecticut, and all business sectors in the state economy benefit from tourism activity directly and/or indirectly. Visitors to Connecticut represent a significant economic benefit as they spend money in the local economy on items such as lodging, food and beverage, retail purchases, and recreation. Visitor spending has an even larger impact as it ripples through the statewide economy, generating revenues and jobs for businesses spanning a wide range of industries. Since the recession, Connecticut's tourism industry has created 5,000 new jobs. Visitors to Connecticut spent $8.3 billion in 2013, generating a total economic impact of $14.0 billion, supporting nearly 119,000 total jobs.[ download article only ] 

  • Occupational Employment and Wages: 2001-2013. April 2015 (360K) Pg.4.
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) estimates employer survey information into detailed wage data for 821 occupations that comprise 22 major categories. Extensive occupational earnings data make the survey useful to both employers and employees. This article utilizes data from 2001, 2004, 2007, 2010, and 2013 to account for the 3-year OES survey cycle. Data is examined mostly at 2-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) level but also dives deeper into 6 digit levels to explain broader changes.[ download article only ] 

  • Employment Recovery Continues for the Fourth Year.  March 2015 (336K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Last year was a continuation of modest employment recovery in Connecticut, with many economic indicators, including unemployment, pointing to positive directions. After our annual revision, Connecticut gained 12,500 jobs (+0.76%) in 2014, which was essentially the same pace as was in 2013, as unemployment rate fell further to 6.6%.

    Fourth Year of Employment Recovery ~ During the March 2008-February 2010 recession, Connecticut lost 119,000 total nonfarm jobs, of which 76% are now recovered (+90,500), while the total private sector recovered 87%. Meanwhile, the nation has now fully regained all of the jobs lost in its last January 2008-February 2010 employment downturn and is on an expansionary path (+128%). download article only ] 

  • Income Inequality, Poverty, and Labor Markets.  February 2015 (297K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    A large part of the current political and economic discussion and debate has been centered on the growing concentration of wealth and income over the last 30 years or so. And this trend has accelerated over the current recovery. Another issue is Poverty, a major consequence of extreme inequality. Therefore, addressing the issues of Poverty requires an understanding of the broader issue of Inequality. With that in mind, the remainder of the discussion will address the 30-year trend of rising Economic Inequality, especially in the U.S., what seems to be driving it, and its connection with labor markets. It will conclude with spotlighting a uniquely American phenomenon that exacerbates the inequality problem: Urban Sprawl. [ download article only ] 

  • The 2015 Economic Outlook.  January 2015 (338K) Pg.1-5
    By Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    As we begin a new year, this issue of the Digest looks at the economic prospects for 2015. As usual, this annual outlook attempts to interpret recent data and their trends, and to offer some insights about what is likely for the U.S. and Connecticut economies in the year ahead.

    The outlook for the U.S. economy in 2015 remains quite positive. A set-back in early 2014 resulting partially from weather-related factors that hampered overall growth was encouragingly offset by considerably stronger growth as the year progressed. Of note, except for a couple of minor dips, the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has now grown for five and a half years since the "Great Recession" ended in Q2-2009.  [ download article only ] 

  • The Minimum Wage Debate: 2014 Update.  November 2014 (364K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    INTRODUCTION: The Minimum Wage Debate — Back with a Vengeance The first version of this article, "The Minimum Wage Debate: The Latest Rounds", appeared in the January 1999 issue of the Connecticut Economic Digest. It was motivated by Connecticut's new minimum-wage increase that went into effect January 1, 1999. It raised the State's minimum wage to $5.65 per hour, and then to $6.15 on January 1, 2000 (or to a value that was indexed to the Federal minimum wage, whichever is greater). Although there was not much opposition in Connecticut, it did spark a national debate and some vocal Congressional opposition, when President Clinton proposed raising the Federal minimum wage. Well, it's Baaack! [ download article only ] 

  • A Closer Look at Home Care Occupations.  October 2014 (464K) Pg.1-5
    By Sarah Pilipaitis, Economist, Department of Labor

    Every two years, the Connecticut Department of Labor produces long-term occupational projections. The 2012-2022 projections show that two of the fastest growing occupations in terms of percent and net change come from the Home Health Care industry. The fastest growing occupation in Connecticut in the ten-year timeframe by net change is projected to be Personal Care Aides with a growth of 38.1 percent and 8,846 jobs. Nearby on the list of fastest growing occupations in Connecticut is Home Health Aides with a projected growth rate of 38.1% and 3,195 jobs from 2012 to 2022.1 The rise in these two occupations warrants a closer look at what each of them entails. [ download article only ] 

  • Long Term Industry and Occupational Projections: 2012-2022.  September 2014 (410K) Pg.1-5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Every two years the Connecticut Department of Labor produces and publishes ten year projections by industry and occupation. This year's projections cover the period 2012-2022, which invites a comparison to the previous ten year period. The 2002-2012 period spans the global financial and economic crisis that caused the worst national recession since the Great Depression. While employment started to increase after the first quarter of 2010, by 2012 employment in many industries was still below 2002 levels. Importantly, the industries that grew the most after the recovery started were not necessarily the same as those that lost the most during the recession, so the industry and occupational mix of the economy has changed. The long term projections help put these changes into perspective and peek over the horizon to see what the industry and occupational profile of the economy would look like if full employment could be achieved within the next decade. [ download article only ] 

  • Covered Employment and Wages: A 2013 Annual Review.  August 2014 (418K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Jonathan Kuchta, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Jonathan.Kuchta@ct.gov

    The number of workers in Connecticut covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI)increased by 0.7 percent during 2013, according to most recent data published from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. This increase built upon the 1.0 percent increase in both 2012 and 2011. Total private industry employment, constituting 85.7 percent of the State's employment total [little changed from 2012's 85.5], increased by 1.0 percent. Government employment decreased by 0.5 percent over the year. [ download article only ]  

  • Is It Just the Weather? Connecticut's Baseline Forecast Suggests Slower Growth in 2014 and 2015.  June 2014 (429K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    In April 2014, the U.S. economy added 288,000 jobs and the unemployment rate (UR) fell by 0.4 percentage points, to its lowest level in five years, and the numbers for February and March were revised upward. However, after increasing in March, 806,000 left the labor force in April, making a shrinking labor force the principal reason for the declining UR. And the first estimate of U.S. GDP for 2014Q12 showed that U.S. economic growth rapidly decelerated. Many have pointed to the harsh winter weather as the principal culprit, and expect that the April jobs report indicates that the U.S. economy will bounce back in the second quarter. But is it just the weather?  [ download article only ] 

  • 2013: Another Year of Modest Economic Recovery.  March 2014 (355K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Last year was another year of modest economic recovery in Connecticut, with many economic indicators, including employment and unemployment, pointing in positive directions. After our annual revision, Connecticut gained 14,300 jobs (+0.9%) in 2013, which was essentially the same pace as in 2012. The unemployment rate fell further to 7.8%. During the March 2008-February 2010 recession, Connecticut lost 119,100 jobs, of which half are now recovered. By comparison, the nation has now regained nearly all of the jobs lost (90.1%) in its last January 2008-February 2010 employment downturn. download article only ] 

  • A Look Back at Connecticut's (Exhausted) UI Claimants February 2014  (335K) Pg.1-5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    Over three and a half years since the end of the Great Recession, Connecticut's unemployment rate remains persistently high. Nationally, long term unemployment as a share of total unemployment at 37.3% is down from its 2010 peak of 45%, but still much higher than prerecession levels. Who are these long-term unemployed? How many have returned to the job market and with what success? This article attempts to shed light on these and other questions. [ download article only ]  

  • The 2014 Economic Outlook.  January 2014 (180K) Pg.1-5
    By Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    As is customary at the beginning of the year, this issue of the Digest looks at the economic prospects for 2014. This outlook attempts to interpret recent data and their trends, and to offer some insights about what they mean for the U.S. and Connecticut economies in the year ahead.

    The outlook for the U.S. economy is reasonably optimistic pending a positive resolution of two fiscal deadlines that loom early in the year, notably the January 15, 2014 end of the continuing resolution funding of the federal government, and the February 7, 2014 end of the nation's borrowing authority. A short-term slowdown in Q4-2013 resulting from the partial government shutdown in October is likely only temporary.  [ download article only ] 

  • WHERE WE WORK: Connecticut's Commuting Patterns.  December 2013 (410K) Pg.1-4
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    According to the American Community Survey conducted every year by the U.S. Census Bureau, on average, over the 2006-10 period, 1,713,272 Connecticut residents commuted to their jobs every workday. From Table 1, 1,618,120 of those Connecticut residents commuted to jobs within Connecticut, while 107,976 commuted to jobs at worksites outside Connecticut. In addition to the Connecticut residents who commuted to their jobs within the state, another 95,152 workers from surrounding states commuted to their jobs at worksites in Connecticut. The net result is that Connecticut exports 12,824 more workers to the surrounding states than it imports form the surrounding states. That makes Connecticut a net exporter of workers.  [ download article only ] 

  • The Monthly Snapshot Is Not the Whole Picture.  October 2013 (344K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Labor markets are more dynamic than revealed in the monthly tallies of changes in employment levels. Two additional sets of indicators – the Business Employment Dynamics (BED)1 and the Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWI)2 help illuminate the workings of the economy and labor market.

    Each month, the Department of Labor reports a snapshot of current employment which can be compared to the level of employment in a previous period, for example the previous year or the previous month. As the table at the top of page 6 shows, in August Connecticut employment fell by 6,000 jobs from July but increased 15,400 from August 2012. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Occupational Employment and Wages in 2013.  October 2013 (344K) Pg.4
    By Michael Fitzgerald, CCT Research Analyst, Department of Labor Michael.Fitzgerald@ct.gov

    The 2013 estimates from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Program were recently released. The estimates show Connecticut's total nonfarm employment at 1,620,620. The two largest occupations in the state are Retail Salespersons (50,070) and Cashiers (39,050), comprising 3.1% and 2.4% of total employment, respectively. The remaining top ten occupations are Registered Nurses; Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive; General and Operations Managers; Customer Service Representatives; Waiters and Waitresses; Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeepers; Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food; and Office Clerks, General. These occupations represent just under 20% of total employment in the state. Ninety-two percent of the employees in the ten largest occupations are employed in the private sector. The percentages range from nearly 100% private employment for Retail Salespersons to 74% for Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners. The overall percentage of private employment in the state is slightly lower at 85%. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Regions and the Current Recovery.  September 2013 (410K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    Over the first four quarters of the current recovery, the first quarter of 2010 (2010Q1) to the first quarter of 2011 (2011Q1), based on seasonally adjusted quarterly data, Connecticut's Non-Farm Employment grew by 1.60%, while U.S. Non-Farm jobs increased by a slower 0.99% rate. Over the second four quarters, 2011Q1 to 2012Q1, the U.S. and Connecticut traded places. Connecticut's job-growth decelerated to 1.26%, while U.S. job-growth accelerated to +1.83%. Over the third four-quarter period of the current recovery, though the U.S. job-growth rate slowed to 1.54%, Connecticut's job-growth nearly came to a standstill, barely increasing at a rate of 0.26%. What happened? [ download article only ] 

  • Covered Employment and Wages: A 2012 Annual Review.  August 2013 (418K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Jonathan Kuchta, CCT, Department of Labor, Jonathan.Kuchta@ct.gov

    The number of workers in CT covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) increased by 1.0 percent during 2012, according to most recent data published from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program (see table on pages 2 and 3). This increase built upon the 1.0 percent increase from 2011, as opposed to the 1.2 percent decline noted in 2010. Total private industry employment, constituting 85.5 percent of the State's employment total [little changed from 2011's 85.3], increased by 1.2 percent. Government employment decreased by 0.5 percent year-over-year. [ download article only ]  

  • Every Time is Different, But This One is Really Different. July 2013  (344K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    No two business cycles are alike, but at least since the 1990's it had become conventional wisdom that recessions in Connecticut would last longer and see much larger job drops than the nation as a whole. This was certainly true of the recessions of 1990 and 2001, but that story didn't hold for the recession that hit Connecticut in 2008. [ download article only ]  

  • Turning Point, Inflection Point, or More of the Same? The Outlook to 2014Q4.  June 2013 (207K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    As of 2013Q1, Connecticut has been in recovery for 12 quarters, or three years. This recovery followed the first collapse of housing and credit bubbles since the 1920's, and the first systemic banking panic since the 1930's. In addition, after the financial system bailout in late 2008 and passage of the stimulus package in early 2009, austerity has won the day, in both in the U.S. and Europe. Consequently, this cycle, including the current recovery, has behaved differently than even other Post Cold War cycles which have been much weaker than other Post World War II Era recoveries. [ download article only ] 

  • Does Education Matter? May 2013  (419K) Pg.1,2 & 5.
    By Sarah York, Economist, Department of Labor Sarah.York@ct.gov

    With the varied reports on the state of the economy recently, many people are finding it difficult to tell which direction the economy is headed. The uncertainty leads many questioning their perceived notion on how to become successful in a chosen career. With increased attention on the costs of higher education coupled with the meek jobs reports, the decision to attend college may not seem worth it. However, an analysis of the most recent data available for Connecticut suggests that there is still a significant benefit to pursue higher education. [ download article only ]  

  • A Look at Phil Fed's Coincident and Leading Indexes.  April 2013 (423K) Pg.4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    State Coincident Indexes. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia produces a monthly coincident index for each of the 50 states and the nation, and it combines four state-level indicators, nonfarm payroll employment, average hours worked in manufacturing, the unemployment rate, and wage and salary disbursements deflated by the consumer price index (U.S. city average) to summarize current economic conditions in a single statistic. The trend for each state's index is set to the trend of its gross domestic product (GDP), so longterm growth in the state's index matches long-term growth in its GDP. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Modest Economic Recovery Continues in 2012.  March 2013 (415K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Many of the Connecticut economic indicators have shown signs of a continuation of a modest economic recovery last year. After our annual revision, Connecticut's employment grew faster than originally estimated, keeping pace with the trend of 2011. Initial December 2012 employment estimate, for instance, was 100 lower than the December 2011 level. But it turns out that we actually had a gain of 8,600 jobs over the same period. And this year is off to a good start with a 4,700 job gain (+0.3%) in January, which is 8,000 more than a year ago. In fact, January's 1,644,400 is the new high in this recovery. Unemployment rate also has been falling steadily in the last five months to 8.1% in January 2013, which is below last year's 8.2%. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Private Sector Hours and Earnings: Working to Get Back to Normal.  February 2013 (348K) Pg.1-5
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, DOL Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov

    In 2007, just prior to the start of the "Great Recession," the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released a new series tracking hours and earnings for all private workers. The data are available for the U.S. and states for the aggregated private sector and major private industry divisions.

    The series was developed because the traditional production worker hours and earnings estimates, produced since 1939 for war planning purposes in the goods-producing industries (construction and manufacturing), no longer captured the U.S. economy. Service-providing sectors were now adding the greater part of the new jobs and output in the globalized 21st century. The monthly estimates (average hourly length of the private sector workweek, average hourly private pay rates, and the average weekly private earnings) are samplebased, and have not yet been officially seasonally adjusted by the BLS. A total private level only estimate (no industry supersectors) is also being calculated for Connecticut's six BLS-recognized labor market areas (LMAs). The new all employee private payroll data, after several years of availability, are starting to give some useful approximations of general workforce trends in the states. download article only ] 

  • The 2013 Economic Outlook.  January 2013 (180K) Pg.1-5
    By Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    As we begin a new year, the Digest looks at the economic prospects for the year ahead. This outlook is an interpretation of some of the most recent data and their trends, and offers some insights about what they portend for the U.S. and Connecticut economies.

    The outlook for the U.S. economy is improving. Real Gross Domestic Product (RGDP) has grown for three and a half years since the "Great Recession" ended in Q2-2009. The constant dollar value of all goods and services produced by labor and capital located in the U.S. since then has averaged 2.2% at an annual rate from the preceding quarter (Figure 1). Decreasing by 3.1% in 2009, growing 2.4% in 2010, 1.8% in 2011, and an estimated 3.1% in Q3-2012, RGDP growth of 1.8% to 2.4% is likely in 2013. The New England Economic Partnership (NEEP), a consortium of government, business, and academia, in its proprietary forecast sees RGDP growth at 2.4% in 2013. The National Association of Business Economists (NABE) outlook panel sees 2.4% growth in 2013 [ download article only ]  

  • Job Polarization in Connecticut.  December 2012 (185K) Pg.1,2 & 5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, DOL, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    In recent months, much has been written of the hollowing out of the middle class during the recovery. A New York Times article partially attributes this to longterm trends of automation and globalization that cause a polarization of labor to high and low wage employment. The same article extensively reports on the findings by The National Employment Law Project (NELP). Their work analyzed nationwide Current Population Survey (CPS) data and found middle wage jobs incurred a majority of job losses during the recession, while lowwage jobs experienced a majority of post-recession job growth. The report also found the share of high wage job losses and subsequent gains to be 19 and 20 percent. [ download article only ]  

  • A Look at the Help Wanted OnLine Data Series.  December 2012 (185K) Pg.3 & 4
    By Sarah York, CCT Economist, DOL, Sarah.York@ct.gov
    Gone are the days when the most effective and utilized job search method was to open up your local newspaper. The use of online databases by job seekers has become much more prevalent in recent years. In an effort to reflect this reality, the Conference Board replaced its Help Wanted newspaper employment index with the Help Wanted OnLine Data Series (HWOL) in 2005. The series can be used for a variety of purposes, but its strengths may lie as an indicator of job demand as represented by employment vacancies and as a leading indicator of potential shifts in actual employment levels. [ download article only ]  

  • Local Area Unemployment Statistics: A Primer.  November 2012 (180K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Unexpected movements in recent unemployment rate numbers surprised and puzzled many data users in the state. While sometimes no plausible explanations can readily be found behind these statistics, the unemployment rate has been and is undoubtedly one of the most important economic indicators in Connecticut and the nation that cannot simply be ignored or dismissed. So do you ever wonder how the unemployment rate is calculated for Connecticut? How about for all nine labor market areas and for all 169 cities and towns? Given the intense focus on Connecticut's unemployment rate the last few months, it is worth spending time to build a common understanding of how the rate is determined. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut and the Housing Bust: A Tale of Two Bubbles  October 2012 (349K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    On July 18, 2012, the Center for Real Estate and Urban Economic Studies (CREUES) at the University of Connecticut released their study in which they found signs of stabilizing housing prices after more than a year of declines. They found that over the previous year prices had stabilized or increased throughout most of Connecticut's markets, and that those areas with declines also showed improvement with smaller drops. Nationally, in their 2012 report released in June, the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University stated:

    After several false starts, there is reason to believe that 2012 will mark the beginning of a true housing market recovery. Sustained employment growth remains key, providing the stimulus for stronger household growth and bringing relief to some distressed homeowners. They went on to caution: While gaining ground, the homeowner market still faces multiple challenges. If the broader economy weakens in the short term, the housing rebound could again stall. [ download article only ] 

  • Unemployment Insurance Covered Employment and Wages: 2011 Annual Review.  August 2012 (418K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Edward T. Doukas, Jr., Research Analyst, Department of Labor Edward.Doukas@ct.gov

    The number of workers in Connecticut covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) laws increased by 1.0 percent during 2011, according to data derived through the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. The 2011 increase reversed the trend over the previous two years when annual average employment declined; down 1.2 percent in 2010 and 4.3 percent in 2009. Total private industry employment, accounting for 85.3 percent of the State's employment total, increased by 1.6 percent, while government employment fell by 1.9 percent. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut Occupational Employment and Wages in 2012.  August 2012 (418K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Lisa Castagna, DOL, Lisa.Castagna@ct.gov) & Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The recently released statistics by the Office of Research in the Connecticut Department of Labor showed that retail salespersons (50,190) and cashiers (39,640) were the occupations with the highest employment in Connecticut. These two occupations combined made up nearly 6 percent of total Connecticut employment. [ download article only ]  

  • Even in Tough Times, Education Improves Chances in Labor Market. July 2012  (419K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    During graduation season, there were a number of stories in the news about the difficulty that many new college graduates are having finding employment, particularly high paying employment within a field related to their course of study. In addition, announcements by many institutions of tuition and fee increases and the debates in Washington about the interest rate changed on student loans generated media attention on the high cost of higher education. Implicit in some of this coverage is the idea that given the high cost of going to college, and the shortterm difficulty of some college graduates in the labor market, a college education might not be "worth it." While "individual results may vary" as they say (in fact they do vary significantly), on average additional education is still associated with increased employment and higher long term earnings prospects. [ download article only ]  

  • Drag Forces From Balance Sheet Recession Still Constrain Growth: The Employment Outlook to 2013  June 2012 (359K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    Drag is the aerodynamic force that opposes an aircraft's motion through the air. If for our analogy, we cast the aircraft as the economy, then the drag force on the economy is the $16.4 trillion collapse in net worth of U.S. households between 2007Q2 and 2009Q1. As of the fourth quarter of 2011, U.S. household net worth was still down $8.4 trillion from its peak. Further, the net worth of non-incorporated businesses was still down $2 trillion from its peak, also in 2007Q2. As noted in The Outlook to 2012, the recent downturn was no "ordinary" recession, and this is not a "normal" recovery. This recovery not only followed a financial panic, but also the first popping of asset bubbles in housing and the stock market, in conjunction with unsustainable levels of household debt since the 1920s. This wiped out the net worth of a significant number of households, as well as unincorporated businesses, leaving in its wake what has been called a Balance Sheet Recession. Balance sheet recessions are steeper and last longer than nonbalance sheet recessions, and they are followed by weaker recoveries5 as households reduce their spending and pay down debt to repair their net worth. [ download article only ] 

  • Is Connecticut a Small Business State? May 2012  (329K) Pg.1-5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Economist, Department of Labor, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    A widely held belief is small businesses create most of the new jobs. Given the recent recession and slow recovery, there is a lot of interest in job creation and policies to promote economic growth. Using a newly available data set from the U.S. Census, this article explores the notion of job creation by both firm age and firm size, and seeks to provide some clarity on the underlying dynamics of Connecticut's labor market.

    The Business Dynamics Statistics (BDS) produced by the U.S. Census Bureau is compiled using the Census Bureau's Business Register. The Business Register covers establishments of all domestic businesses including the self-employed, but excluding private households and governments. The BDS dataset tabulates data at the establishment level (an establishment is a fixed physical location where economic activity takes place). Establishments all belong to firms (a firm may be the parent of one establishment or multiple establishments). When analyzing BDS data for Connecticut it is important to note that though the establishments are all based within Connecticut, parent firms for Connecticut's establishments can be located anywhere in the nation. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut Continues on a Path to Recovery.  March 2012 (415K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, DOL Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov & Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Connecticut's employment recovery from the devastating global financial recession continues. However, much more remediation, rebirth, and renewal are needed for a stable and lasting jobs revival. The January 2012 total nonfarm employment estimate is off to a promising start toward that end with a 7,100 job gain (0.4%). And the year-over-year job growth is accelerating to 0.7% in January 2012 from 0.5% in December 2011. The recently revised seasonally adjusted employment estimates confirm that Connecticut is making its way beyond this generational downturn. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Bioscience Industry: An Update.  February 2012 (415K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Stan McMillen, Ph.D., Managing Economist, DECD, Stan.McMillen@ct.gov & Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov
    The "Bioscience Connecticut" initiative that emerged in May 2011 is an $864 million investment that intends to make the University of Connecticut's Health Center (UCHC) a hub of research and clinical work in bioscience. This initiative reinforces the state's ongoing and renewed commitment to make Connecticut a leader in the bioscience industry. The "Bioscience Connecticut" initiative anticipates creating 3,000 jobs annually from 2012 through 2018 in the construction of a new patient tower and ambulatory care facility and renovations to existing research facilities. The plan estimates the creation of 16,400 jobs through 2037, a doubling of federal and industry research grants, as well as increased access to high quality health care, increased medical and dental school enrollments (+30%) and an increase in the number of primary and specialty care clinicians to meet forecasted workforce shortages and increased demand for healthcare services.  [ download article only ] 

  • The Connecticut Economic Outlook for 2012.  January 2012 (410K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Stan McMillen, Ph.D., Managing Economist, DECD, Stan.McMillen@ct.gov & Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    Since the "Great Recession" ended in Q2-2009 per the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Business Cycle Dating Committee, real gross domestic product (RGDP) growth has been positive. The growth rate of the constant dollar value of all goods and services produced by labor and capital located in the U.S. has averaged 2.5% at an annual rate from the preceding quarter (Figure 1) In 2010, RGDP grew 3.0%, after decreasing by 0.3% in 2008 and 3.5% in 2009. We believe U.S. RGDP growth will be between 1.5% and 2% in 2012. The New England Economic Partnership (NEEP), a consortium of government, business and academia, in its proprietary forecast sees RGDP growth at 1.8% in 2012. The National Association of Business Economists (NABE) outlook panel sees 2.4% growth in 2012.  [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's UI Exhaustees: Where Are They Now? * November 2011  (351K) Pg.1-3, 5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Economist, Department of Labor, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    The recession of the late 2000's is the worst to hit the United States since the depression of the 1930's. Nineteen months after the official completion of Connecticut's recession, the unemployment rate is still stubbornly stuck around 9%. Based on data from the Current Employment Survey (CES), it is estimated about 119,000 jobs were lost in Connecticut through December 2009. Connecticut gained 24,300 jobs from January 2010, the end of Connecticut's recession, to January 2011. However, from January 2011 to July 2011, only about 8,500 jobs have been created. At the current level of job growth, it will take many years to employ those laid off by the recession. [ download article only ]

    * This a partial reprint of "Following Connecticut's Unemployment Insurance Claimants Through the Recession," by Manisha Srivastava, DOL, October 2011. For the full report, including an analysis on the demographics of current claimants, download: http://www1.ctdol.state.ct.us/lmi/pubs/ConnecticutUIClaimants.pdf

  • Young People Aren't Fleeing and the Cities Aren't Dying. October 2011  (419K) Pg.1-3, 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, DOL, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Data from the U.S. Census Bureau refute the conventional wisdom that young people are leaving Connecticut in droves and the population of our cities is in decline. One example of popular perceptions comes from the "2011 Survey of Connecticut Business" released in early September by BlumShapiro and CBIA which reported "An overwhelming majority of respondents (85%) worry about the state's slow population growth and out-migration of 21-to-45 year-olds." Similarly, when population estimates from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS) were released, a press release was headlined "Connecticut Still at Bottom in Attracting, Keeping 25-34-Year-Olds." In fact, the 2010 U.S. Census confirms that Ct's population is aging, but that the situation is not as dire or dramatic as perceptions would suggest. [ download article only ]  

  • Covered Employment and Wages: 2010 Annual Review.  August 2011 (412K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Edward T. Doukas, Jr., Research Analyst, Department of Labor Edward.Doukas@ct.gov

    Employment in Connecticut covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) decreased by 1.2 percent during 2010, according to preliminary figures that recently became available through the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. While 2010 recorded the second consecutive drop in annual average employment, the rate of decline was less than in 2009 when covered employment dropped by 4.3 percent. Total private industry employment, constituting 84.8 percent of the State's employment total, decreased by 1.1 percent, while government employment fell by 1.7 percent. [ download article only ] 

  • The Ups and Downs of Recovering from a Balance Sheet Recession: The Outlook to 2012  June 2011 (417K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    The ups and downs of this recovery continue as U.S. GDP growth decelerated from 3.1% (on an annualized basis) in 2010Q4 to 1.8% in 2011Q1. But then, U.S. nonfarm payroll employment grew by 244,000 in April. After the killing of Osama bin Laden, commodity prices, including oil, plummeted the first week of May. However, this may have also been driven by the retreat of speculators and a bearish outlook for the world economy. [ download article only ] 

  • Manufacturing Isn't Dead: It Doesn't Even Look That Way!  April 2011 (421K) Pg.3
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor,Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Some have erroneously declared manufacturing "dead," particularly in a state like Connecticut that has seen manufacturing's share of total employment fall nearly in half in the past twenty years. But this pronouncement is not just "premature" (to quote Mark Twain) but completely unwarranted. While a smaller share of total employment, manufacturing is and will continue to be a vital component of Connecticut's economy and labor market, and Connecticut will remain a place where manufacturers can grow and prosper. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Recovery Began in January 2010.  March 2011 (408K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The Great Recession II that began in March 2008 has ended in January 2010 for Connecticut, as measured by the total nonfarm employment. The newly revised seasonally adjusted employment data showed January 2010 to be the bottom of this awful economic downturn, one month later than originally anticipated. Over the 22 months of the recession, nearly 119,200 jobs were lost, about 20,000 more than originally estimated last March (see "Connecticut Recession to End in December 2009?" Connecticut Economic Digest, March 2010). [ download article only ] 

  • The Connecticut Economic Outlook for 2011.  January 2011 (410K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Stan McMillen, Ph.D., Managing Economist, DECD, Stan.McMillen@ct.gov & Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    The Nation. We expect the modest expansion of the U.S. economy that began in the third quarter of 2009 will continue in 2011. The outlook for continued recovery from the longest recession since the 1930s that began in December 2007 and lasted 18 months is tempered by harsh realities - notably, unacceptably high unemployment and a weak housing market. Yet, private sector employment increased in each month last year, totaling 1.1 million jobs through October 2010. Privately-owned housing starts in September were at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 610,000 or 4.1% above the Sept'2009 rate of 586,000. U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew at an average rate of 2.8% each quarter since the Q3-2009 expansion began.  [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Gross Domestic Product Declines in 2009.  December 2010 (550K) Pg.5
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, Department of Labor Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov

    Connecticut's Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the most comprehensive measure of total economic activity or value added in the state, was down as expected in 2009. On both a real (chained 2005 dollars) and current dollar basis, Connecticut GDP declined. The decrease in real CT GDP, which considers inflation's impact, was -3.1%, while the drop in current dollar GDP fell 1.2% from 2008 estimates.* Connecticut's real GDP was estimated at $205.7 billion and current dollar value GDP was calculated at $227.4 billion.  [ download article only ] 

  • The Face of the Long-Term Unemployed.  November 2010 (473K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Manisha Srivastava, CCT Economist, Department of Labor Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov
    After much political debate, Congress approved extending unemployment insurance benefits for the long-term unemployed until November 30, 2010. The extended Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) program is 100% federally funded. This is in contrast to the regular Unemployment Compensation (UC) program that is fully State funded. The EUC program is a newly created program as of June 30, 2008 in response to the current financial crisis. It is the first time in the 75-year history of UC that benefits have been extended for up to 99 weeks. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Employment and Wages: A 2009 Review.  August 2010 (411K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Edward T. Doukas, Jr., Research Analyst, Department of Labor Edward.Doukas@ct.gov

    The recessionary impacts on Connecticut's economy that began being felt during the second half of 2008 took full effect in 2009. Connecticut's Unemployment Insurance (UI) covered employment dropped 4.3 percent during 2009. Records going back as far as 1969 show 2009's percentage decline was the second largest only behind the 5 percent drop that occurred during 1991. Another indicator of the economic woes the State faced in 2009 was that the average annual wage of Connecticut workers ($57,755) decreased from the previous year ($58,334). A review of data dating back as far as 1969 shows that this was only the second time this anomaly has occurred. The only other year that annual pay per employee decreased was 2002. [ download article only ] 

  • Forecast to 2011: Navigating the Crosscurrents.  June 2010 (212K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov
    On May 6, 2010, the Dow plunged nearly 1,000 points until recovering to close down 347.80 (-3.20%) points, an unpleasant reminder of 2008. Despite the infamous "fat finger" glitch and model-driven threshold selling, the underlying driver of the market's gyrations was the sovereign debt crisis centered on Greece. It is a stark reminder that the world's financial system is still very fragile. On the other hand, the U.S. jobs report for April 2010, which came out the next day, showed that the national economy had added 290,000 jobs in April the best monthly performance in four years. These two events highlight the strong crosscurrents that are pulling the economy, both up and down at the same time, as this apparent turning point proceeds. [ download article only ] 
  • Unemployment Insurance Supports the State's Economy.  May 2010 (203K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    There are two sets of objectives addressed by the unemployment insurance system. The primary objectives are aimed directly at providing financial help to workers during temporary periods of involuntary unemployment, thereby reducing the economic insecurity faced by individuals and their families. The secondary objectives are to promote economic stability and efficiency. The focus of this article is on the role of unemployment insurance (UI) as an automatic stabilizer for the economy, to dampen the amplitude of the business cycle. By design, automatic stabilizers dampen fluctuations in economic activity as those fluctuations occur. Unemployment insurance works by putting a floor under the fall in consumers' disposable income. It provides eligible unemployed workers with temporary benefit payments, thereby cushioning their decline in disposable personal income. [ download article only ] 

  • U.S. Census Brings Temporary Federal Jobs.  April 2010 (145K) Pg.4
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, Department of Labor Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov

    By now most Connecticut households have received their 2010 Census forms. Advanced notifications were sent out in early March, followed soon after by the official 2010 Census forms. The 2010 Census forms were projected to arrive at U.S. residences in late March, to be completed and customarily returned in April. April 1st is National Census Day, and some newly hired census takers were expected to start late on March 31st with a rural canvassing and an urban homeless headcount campaign. Then a labor-intensive address follow-up and localized information drive is normally planned for May through July. By mid-summer, the short-term local economic impacts of the Census will be all but over. An evaluation of federal government civilian employment for Connecticut over the last four decades shows the U.S. Census employment buildup that occurs once every ten years in the state seems to follow this basic pattern. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Recession to End in December 2009?  March 2010 (423K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The Great Recession II that began in March 2008 may finally be over for Connecticut. The newly revised nonfarm employment data appears to show December 2009 to be the bottom of this treacherous economic downturn. While we added 2,300 jobs in January, and need to see how the next several months will pan out, it appears that our State's economy has begun to rebound. Connecticut's year-over-year percent changes in employment began to decline at a slower rate starting in September 2009, and recovery in terms of output has already begun nationally. The State's average weekly initial claims data peaked in March 2009 and has been trending down. The stock market also bottomed out in March last year and corporate profits have rebounded. Even last year's employment trend in the Connecticut employment services industry, a leading indicator of our State's total nonfarm employment, appears to have bottomed out. However, while the prospects of employment dropping below December 2009's level is not anticipated, the uncertain nature of the economy warrants a cautious approach, as both the national and Connecticut's recovery remain tenuous at best. [ download article only ] 

  • Last but Not Dead.  February 2010  (401K) Pg.1-2, 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Several media stories have reported that "Connecticut's job growth ranks dead last in the nation." The truth of this statement depends on the answer to the question, "since when?" For example, if the period used to calculate job growth is February 1989 to December 2009 then the statement is true. Payroll employment in Connecticut is down more than 3.5% from where it was more than 20 years ago, giving us the worst job performance in the country. On this measure, Connecticut is below even Michigan (down about 1.4%) and Rhode Island (down 2.1%) with the rest of the nation showing gains. [ download article only ] 

  • The Connecticut Economic Outlook for 2010.  January 2010 (413K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Stan McMillen, Ph.D., Managing Economist, DECD, Stan.McMillen@ct.gov & Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    The Nation. In 2010, the U.S. economy will begin recovering from the current severe recession that began in December 2007. This outlook is supported by historic experience and recent positive developments. Since World War II, the average length of U.S. recessions has been 10.5 months with the longest lasting 16 months. The current recession is already longer and some observers consider it to have ended in the third quarter of 2009 (Q3-2009). They note that quarter-over-quarter real gross domestic product (RGDP) grew at an annualized rate of 2.8% from Q2-2009 according to the revised estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). In Q2-2009, RGDP declined by 0.7%, moderating from Q1-2009 when RGDP declined by 6.4%. [ download article only ] 

  • 1997: The year of titanic job growth March 1998, (231K) Pg.1, 4.

  • 1998 Economy: At Full Speed. March 1999, (449K) Pg.1, 4.

  • 1999 Economy Will Slow, But Continue To Grow. January 1999, (281K) Pg.1-2.

  • 2001: A Recession Odyssey. March 2002, (235K) Pg.1-5.

  • 2002: A Year to Keep the Hope for a Stronger Economy. January 2002, (226K) Pg.1-2.

  • 2007: Another Good Year for State Employment Growth March 2008, (636K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • A 2004 recovery: wishful or real? January 2004, (222K) Pg.1-3.

  • A Tale of Seven Cities: Clues to the Hartford region's economic future? February 2004, (224K) Pg.1.

  • Bradley Airport's Economic Contribution Studied July 2005, (551K) Pg.2-5.

  • Business and Employment Changes. October 2003, (230K) Pg.5.

  • Business Openings and Expansions. February 2001, (231K) Pg.4.

  • Business Openings and Expansions. November 2001, (237K) Pg.1-3.

  • Business Starts and Terminations by Industry, 2004. December 2005, (551K) Pg.1-3.

  • Confidence in Connecticut Business Climate Sustained. March 2002, (235K) Pg.7.

  • Connecticut Business Climate Index Launched. November 1999, (194K) Pg.1-3.

  • Connecticut Economic Outlook for 2007. January 2007, (577K) Pg.1-2.

  • Connecticut Recession Began in March 2008 March 2009, (429K) Pg.1.

  • Connecticut's Economy: A Look Back...and Ahead. January 2005, (661K) Pg.2-5.

  • Connecticut's Travel and Tourism Industry: Important Economic Driver. August 2003, (240K) Pg.2-3.

  • Does Connecticut have a Problem with Economic Growth? July 2006, (643K) Pg.1.

  • Economic News. October 2003, (230K) Pg.5.

  • Economic outlook strong for 1998. January 1998, (227K) Pg.1-2.

  • Economic Recovery Underway in 2004 March 2005, (1,033K) Pg.2-5.

  • Economy improves further in 1996. March 1997, (319K) Pg.1-4.

  • Economy's Strengths Sustainable? January 2001, (249K) Pg.1-2.

  • Employment Declines for the Second Year. March 2003, (266K) Pg.5.

  • Employment declines for the third year. March 2004, (241K) Pg.1-5.

  • Estimating the Impact of Public Policy and Investment Decisions. May 2003, (253K) Pg.1-5.

  • Expansion At Last! March 2000, (181K) Pg.1-4.

  • Expansion Continued in 2000 March 2001, (226K) Pg.3-5.

  • Gross State Product Grew 4.7 Percent in 1999. July 2001, (215K) Pg.5.

  • Gross State Product Reviewed. September 1999, (178K) Pg.1-4.

  • Health Care and Social Assistance Industry Profiled. February 2007, (501K) Pg.1-2.

  • Identifying Turns in Connecticut's Economy. January 2002, (226K) Pg.1-2.

  • Is Connecticut rising to the global economy challenge? April 2005, (962K) Pg.2-5.

  • It’s an Exciting Time to be an Economist February 2009, (407K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • New Beginnings. February 2002, (207K) Pg.1-2.

  • Partnership for Growth II: A Blueprint for Connecticut's Economic Future. May 2004, (211K) Pg.1-5.

  • Positive Signs for State Economy in 2000. January 2000, (176K) Pg.1-2.

  • Regional Economic Retrospective. April 2001, (230K) Pg.1-3.

  • Running Towards a Healthy Economy. September 2001, (233K), Pg.1-4.

  • Small Business Profile May 2005, (564K) Pg.2-5.

  • The 2003 Economic Outlook. January 2003, (248K) Pg.1-2.

  • The 2006 Economic Outlook: New Year, New Optimism. January 2006, (557K) Pg.1-3.

  • The 2008 Economic Outlook January 2008, (620K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • The 2009 Economic Outlook January 2009, (407K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • The Next Recovery: Perhaps Not Quite So Jobless October 2009, (422K) Pg.1-4.

  • The Connecticut Business Cycle: A Short History (1939 - 2002). June 2002, (232K) Pg.1-4.

  • The older workforce and its implications for the Connecticut economy. April 2004, (235K) Pg.1-5.

  • The Patriots are Coming! The Patriots are Coming! February 1999, (429K) Pg.2-3.

  • The "X" Economy. November 2001, (237K) Pg.4.

  • Who is Moving into Connecticut? October 2007, (574K) Pg.1-2, 5.

top
  • Is Connecticut Losing Jobs to Other States?  November 2017 (353K) Pg.1-5
    By Andy Condon Ph.D., Director of Research, Department of Labor, Andrew.Condon@ct.gov

    Rightly or wrongly, Connecticut's job growth performance is often talked about in the context of “winning” or “losing” to other parts of the country. This article uses the location quotient measure to begin to address this issue by using national Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) data to measure relative job growth from and to Connecticut over time. According to the US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics, location quotients are ratios that allow an area's distribution of employment by industry, ownership, and size class to be compared to a reference area's distribution. download article only ] 

  • Robots in the Workplace: Threat or Asset?  July 2017 (337K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    The latest breakthroughs in robotics and artificial intelligence have awakened fears that technological advances will lead to a large decrease in the overall level of employment and widespread unemployment. While there will be disruptions, and many occupations are at high risk of computerization over the next decade or two, the dynamic labor market continues to create opportunities for workers with the right skills and education. .  [ download article only ] 

  • Annual Unemployment Rate by Town, 2012-2016.  June 2017 (336K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    By looking at the unemployment rates, we can see that Connecticut has experienced six years of economic recovery. Unemployment rates come from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For a brief explanation of the methodology of LAUS, see "Labor Force Estimates" on page 23. In the June 2016 Digest, 2011-2015 annual average town unemployment rate estimates were published. This year, revised 2012-2016 data are analyzed. download article only ] 

  • Short-Term Employment Projections Through 2018.  May 2017 (355K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor and Patrick.Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor

    Each year, the Office of Research at the Connecticut Department of Labor produces short-term employment projections by industry and occupation. The projections are based on a careful analysis of the Connecticut economy and labor market.

    Current Situation
    March of 2010 was the first month of payroll job growth after the great recession. Seven years later the Connecticut economy has regained 91,200 jobs or 77% of the 119,100 lost during the "great recession" as of March 2017. Overall employment growth has been dampened by the government sector which is down 14,000 jobs since February 2010. Private sector employment has fared significantly better having recovered 94% of the jobs lost during the downturn. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Economic Recovery Continues in 2016.  March 2017 (346K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Although still yet to fully recover from the latest employment downturn, the Connecticut economy continued to improve in 2016, albeit at a slower pace. The total nonfarm employment increased for the sixth year. The unemployment rate fell for six consecutive years. Real personal income rose for the third year. Other economic indicators, however, were somewhat mixed.

    Nonfarm Employment
    After our annual revision, Connecticut gained (based on annual average, not seasonally adjusted data) 5,000 jobs (+0.3%) in 2016, which was fewer than the 12,600 jobs (+0.8%) in 2015. Last year's employment recovery was the slowest in the last six years. Nationally, employment grew faster at 2.1% in 2015 and 1.7% in 2016. On a monthly seasonally adjusted basis through January 2017, Connecticut has now recovered 70% (+83,600) of the total nonfarm jobs lost during the March 2008-February 2010 employment recession (-119,100), while the total private sector regained 92% of its job loss. By contrast, the nation has not only fully regained all of the jobs lost during its January 2008-February 2010 employment downturn, but has also added 82% more jobs by January his year.. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities in 2015.  February 2017 (334K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    Connecticut lost 44 lives to work injuries in 2015. With an increase from 2014's revised count of 35, this is the biggest loss since 2010. It is also above Connecticut's annual average of 39 work-related deaths. Nationally, a total of 4,836 fatal workplace injuries occurred in 2015. This was a slight increase from 2014's reported 4,821 deaths. However, the rate of fatalities per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers fell from 3.43 in 2014 to 3.38 in 2015. [ download article only ] 

  • The Crossroads of Millennials and Migration.  December 2016 (411K) Pg.1-5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Connecticut Office of Policy and Management, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    The nation is closely watching the actions of millennials - what do millennials like, what are their work preferences, where do millennials want to live? And there is good reason for this attention - millennials now make up the largest living generation. According to the Pew Research Center, millennials, whom they define as born between 1981 and 1997, recently surpassed baby boomers in 2015 as the largest living generation. As a result the preferences of millennials do have a sizable impact on the economy - and their choices have substantially deviated from those of prior generations. But as millennials age their preferences likely will return to historical norms, which could benefit Connecticut. Long-run domestic migration patterns show Connecticut has historically imported adults in their late twenties and thirties (and forties when international migration is included). As millennials start settling down and moving into larger homes, safe communities, and for good schools, hopefully Connecticut will stand out as a top destination. [ download article only ] 

  • Next Generation Economic Development.  November 2016 (319K) Pg.4
    By Al Sylvestre, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Alan.Sylvestre@ct.gov

    Connecticut is dependent on large employers for jobs and job growth. A significant proportion of private-sector employment is in companies with 500 or more employees. Early this year, based on the premise that Connecticut's economy would benefit from job growth among businesses of all sizes, the Capitol Region Council of Governments convened a panel of experts composed of business and government leaders to generate ideas for nurturing small to medium-size businesses in economic sectors that show promise for bringing more wellpaying jobs to Connecticut. The successful firms described below show that Connecticut has the potential to experience growth in diverse industries. download article only ] 

  • Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment Rates by Labor Market Area, 1990-July 2016.  October 2016 (404K) Pg.4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    In addition to not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate estimates, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) also produces monthly seasonally adjusted data by major labor market areas (LMAs) for Connecticut, going back to 1990. Because of the one-month lag, these estimates are not published in the Labor Situation or the Connecticut Economic Digest, but they are available upon request. This article looks at the long-term monthly trends of seasonally adjusted unemployment rates of all the LMAs. The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research separately produced seasonally adjusted estimates for small areas (Enfield, Torrington-Northwest, and Danielson-Northeast) so that all areas in the state can be compared and analyzed. Note that because of the recent geographical changes, these small non-BLS LMAs can be seasonally adjusted only back to 2010. download article only ] 

  • Long Term Industry and Occupational Projections: 2014-2024.  September 2016 (354K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, DOL, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov and Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, DOL, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    NATIONAL PROJECTIONS ~ Every two years, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics produces 10 year projections of the U.S. labor force and employment by industry and occupation. The latest projections are for the period 2014 to 2024.

    Labor Force ~ The U.S. labor force is projected to increase by 9.8 million workers from 2014 to 2024 (a 0.6% annualized growth rate) with the 2024 labor force projected to be older and more diverse. The number of workers aged 55 and older is expected to increase by more than 6.7 million (+19.8%) while the number aged 16 to 24 is projected to decrease by 2.8 million (-13.1%) with the largest labor force cohort – those aged 25 to 54 (also known as prime-age workers) up just 3.9 million (+3.9%). As a percent of the labor force, the 16-24 cohort will fall 2.1 percentage points to 14.1% in 2024; increased postsecondary enrollment is a primary cause of this share decrease. [ download article only ] 

  • Business Formation in Connecticut: 2000-2015.  August 2016 (328K) Pg.4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Secretary of the State's office maintains records of all business entities in the state. From these records, an aggregation of business type and location has produced interesting data on business formation change in Connecticut over time. This information is available publicly from 1980 to 2015 by business entity type and geographically down to town levels. This article examines business formation change from 2000-2015 and shows how recent cyclical factors have impacted business development in the state. [ download article only ]  

  • Introducing the Job-to-Job Flows Data.  July 2016 (365K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    This article introduces a new set of statistics about the dynamic nature of the labor market – the Job-to-Job Flows. These statistics provide information on workers who leave or lose one job and take another with little or no unemployment in between. For example, when a worker quits one job to take a better job at a different company, this will be counted as a job-to-job flow. While the data is still considered "Beta" and will be enhanced and improved in future years, the recently released numbers help us understand job changes in Connecticut.  [ download article only ] 

  • Labor Force Participation Rate and Employment-Population Ratio, 1976-2016.  June 2016 (402K) Pg.1-2 & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    The Connecticut Economic Digest now publishes the monthly labor force participation rate and employment-population ratio, which are found under the "Unemployment" table on page 6. These two data, produced by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), provide additional perspectives to the unemployment rate data in assessing the current economic condition. This article also looks at their entire historical trends. download article only ] 

  • Annual Town Unemployment Rates, 2011-2015.  June 2016 (402K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    Unemployment rates come from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For a brief explanation of the methodology of LAUS, see "Labor Force Estimates" on page 23. In July 2015 Digest, 2010-2014 annual average town unemployment rate estimates were published. This year, revised 2011-2015 data are analyzed. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Short-Term Employment Outlook to 2017.  May 2016 (347K) Pg.1-5
    By Sarah Pilipaitis, Economist, Department of Labor

    Connecticut is now into its sixth year of recovery from the recession that took its toll on the state from 2008 to 2010. Over the recession, Connecticut lost over 5% of its nonfarm employment, roughly 91,100 jobs based on annual averages. The annual average nonfarm employment reached its peak in 2008 at 1,699,100 jobs. By the time it reached the trough in 2010, the state's employment had fallen to 1,608,000 jobs. The largest losses came from the construction, manufacturing, trade, transportation and utilities, and the professional and business services sectors. Those four sectors alone accounted for 80% of the lost jobs. The lone sector that was able to create jobs during the recession was education and health services, expanding by about 10,000 jobs from the peak to trough years. [ download article only ] 

  • Employment Grew for the Fifth Year.  March 2016 (322K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Although not yet completely recovered from the latest employment recession, 2015 was a year of continued moderate economic growth for Connecticut. For the fifth year in a row, our State's total nonfarm employment grew. The unemployment rate fell for five straight years. Real personal income rose for the second year. The majority of the other economic indicators also showed that our overall economy performed well.

    Nonfarm Employment - After our annual revision, Connecticut gained (based on annual average, not seasonally adjusted data) 12,500 jobs (+0.75%) in 2015, which was slightly more than the 11,400 jobs (+0.69%) in 2014. Nationally, employment grew faster at 1.9% in 2014 and 2.1% in 2015. Connecticut has now recovered 73% (+86,700) of the total nonfarm jobs lost during the March 2008-February 2010 employment recession (-119,100), while the total private sector regained 86% of its job loss. By contrast, the nation has not only fully regained all of the jobs lost during its January 2008-February 2010 employment downturn, but has also added 56% more jobs by January of this year. download article only ] 

  • Economic Status of People with Disabilities.  February 2016 (321K) Pg.1-5
    By Al Sylvestre, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Alan.Sylvestre@ct.gov

    In the eight years since the recession that began in 2008, conditions in Connecticut's labor market continue to improve. As a segment of the working-age population age 16 years and older that constitutes 5% of the work force, among whom 44% are employed full time according to the US Census Bureau's most recent (2014) American Community Survey (ACS), people with disabilities are becoming increasingly visible in the labor market. What follows is a brief examination of this population's economic characteristics as well as some of the programs and services that provide access to opportunities for its members to attach to the labor force and retain employment in response to changes in disability status.. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities, 1992-2014.  December 2015 (433K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    Throughout our history, the American worker has labored not only to erect buildings and cities, but also to raise the standards of our Nation's workplaces. Through protests and picket lines, by organizing and raising their voices together, workers have won small and large victories that have pushed our country closer to ensuring safer and healthier jobs for all.

    Across the United States, as dedicated Americans clock in at factories, walk onto construction sites, put on their hospital uniforms, and report to do the daily work that drives our Nation's progress, they give meaning to the simple yet profound belief that if you work hard and take responsibility, you can get ahead. However, each year millions of people have their shifts cut short by work-related injuries and illnesses, and on average, 12 Americans lose their lives on the job every day." - President Barack Obama

    In 2014, America lost 4,679 people to work-related deaths. Thirty-three of those deaths were in Connecticut. Connecticut's "low" number is primarily due to low employment in high-risk industries. However, it cannot be stressed enough that what is statistically unremarkable has a devastating impact on loved ones. One work-related death is one too many. [ download article only ] 

  • Construction Occupational Employment Trend, 2005-2013. August 2015 (345K) Pg.4.
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The bursting of the housing bubble hit certain areas of the economy harder than others. Though Connecticut was not an epicenter of the housing bubble and bust, its impact can be seen when examining construction occupational employment. This article uses data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS) as it provides estimates of labor market variables not captured in other datasets, including unemployment by occupation and prior occupation of those not in the labor force. From this we can get a generalized idea of how construction occupations in Connecticut have fared during the recession and recovery.[ download article only ] 

  • Annual Town Unemployment Rates, 2010-2014.  July 2015 (338K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Unemployment rate data are from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Recently LAUS underwent a major revision back to 2010. download article only ] 

  • Examining Education, Incomes, and the "Skills Gap".  June 2015 (280K) Pg.1-3, 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    While the unemployment rate has dropped sharply over the past few years, it remains higher than it was before the "great recession" began. On the other hand, the number and rate of job openings are higher than their prerecession levels. In March, there were five million job openings nationally despite an unemployment rate of 5.4%, a percentage point higher than prevailed in 2006 and 2007. Despite the pool of unemployed job-seekers, some business groups report that their members are having difficulty hiring employees with the skills and experience they are seeking. This has led some to conclude that there is a gap between the skills available in the labor force and the needs of employers. [ download article only ] 

  • A Review of 2004-2014 Employment Projections.  June 2015 (280K) Pg.4
    By Michael Fitzgerald, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Michael.Fitzgerald@ct.gov

    It will be years—not in my time—before a woman will become Prime Minister." That's a quote made by Margaret Thatcher in 1969, ten years before she took over as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in 1979. In other words, projections—especially 10 years ahead of time—are difficult. Every two years, the Office of Research at the Connecticut Department of Labor creates 10-year employment projections for the state. Now that employment statistics for 2014 have been released, we are going to take a look at the 2004-2014 projections and see how well the projections fared. Statewide numbers for the Major Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) groupings and Occupation Employment Statistics data from 2014 will be what is focused on. There are a couple of things to bear in mind when looking at the original projections. [ download article only ] 

  • The Economic Impact of Tourism in Connecticut. May 2015 (367K) Pg.1-5
    Tourism Economics - Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development

    Tourism is an important economic engine in Connecticut, and all business sectors in the state economy benefit from tourism activity directly and/or indirectly. Visitors to Connecticut represent a significant economic benefit as they spend money in the local economy on items such as lodging, food and beverage, retail purchases, and recreation. Visitor spending has an even larger impact as it ripples through the statewide economy, generating revenues and jobs for businesses spanning a wide range of industries. Since the recession, Connecticut's tourism industry has created 5,000 new jobs. Visitors to Connecticut spent $8.3 billion in 2013, generating a total economic impact of $14.0 billion, supporting nearly 119,000 total jobs.[ download article only ] 

  • Occupational Employment and Wages: 2001-2013. April 2015 (360K) Pg.4.
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) estimates employer survey information into detailed wage data for 821 occupations that comprise 22 major categories. Extensive occupational earnings data make the survey useful to both employers and employees. This article utilizes data from 2001, 2004, 2007, 2010, and 2013 to account for the 3-year OES survey cycle. Data is examined mostly at 2-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) level but also dives deeper into 6 digit levels to explain broader changes.[ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities, 1992-2013.  December 2014 (433K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    "No one should have to sacrifice their life for their livelihood, because a nation built on the dignity of work must provide safe working conditions for its people." –Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez In 2013, work injuries claimed the lives of 4,405 workers in America. Twenty-six of those deaths occurred in Connecticut.

    Since 1992, the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics has conducted the annual Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) to document workplace fatalities. Connecticut averages 39 workrelated fatalities annually with a high of 57 in 1998. In 2013, Connecticut saw the lowest recorded number of 26 lost workers. This "low" number is not statistically notable and cannot be attributed to a specific cause. However, it cannot be stressed enough that what is statistically unremarkable has a devastating impact on loved ones. One workrelated death is one too many. As Dr. David Michaels, the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, states, "Making a living shouldn't have to cost you your life. Workplace fatalities, injuries, and illnesses are preventable. Safe jobs happen because employers make the choice to fulfill their responsibilities and protect their workers." [ download article only ] 

  • Long Term Industry and Occupational Projections: 2012-2022.  September 2014 (410K) Pg.1-5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Every two years the Connecticut Department of Labor produces and publishes ten year projections by industry and occupation. This year's projections cover the period 2012-2022, which invites a comparison to the previous ten year period. The 2002-2012 period spans the global financial and economic crisis that caused the worst national recession since the Great Depression. While employment started to increase after the first quarter of 2010, by 2012 employment in many industries was still below 2002 levels. Importantly, the industries that grew the most after the recovery started were not necessarily the same as those that lost the most during the recession, so the industry and occupational mix of the economy has changed. The long term projections help put these changes into perspective and peek over the horizon to see what the industry and occupational profile of the economy would look like if full employment could be achieved within the next decade. [ download article only ] 

  • 75 years of state monthly nonfarm employment statistics. July 2014  (411K) Pg.3-4
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, DOL Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov

    In the beginning tate and national nonfarm industry employment statistics officially begin their time-series in 1939 just before the start of World War II. More expanded reports on state and national employment, however, were already being called for by the late 1800's because of rapid industrialization, and during the Great Depression for more national economic planning to emerge from that lasting downturn. By 1940, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) moved to consolidate much of the work already being performed by federal statistical agencies, cooperating state research bureaus, and statistical and industrial societies for war planning purposes before WWII and began producing a national nonagricultural employment series for all 48 states, just as the US was preparing for war. This may have facilitated the redirection and awareness of industrial planning during and after the second world war across the country especially as the GI's returned home looking for jobs – ready with pent-up demand. (Most of the state data development, firm sampling, and nonfarm employment estimation work were performed in each individual state from about 1947 until recently – 2011. States still are a big part of the process.) [ download article only ]  

  • Is It Just the Weather? Connecticut's Baseline Forecast Suggests Slower Growth in 2014 and 2015.  June 2014 (429K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    In April 2014, the U.S. economy added 288,000 jobs and the unemployment rate (UR) fell by 0.4 percentage points, to its lowest level in five years, and the numbers for February and March were revised upward. However, after increasing in March, 806,000 left the labor force in April, making a shrinking labor force the principal reason for the declining UR. And the first estimate of U.S. GDP for 2014Q12 showed that U.S. economic growth rapidly decelerated. Many have pointed to the harsh winter weather as the principal culprit, and expect that the April jobs report indicates that the U.S. economy will bounce back in the second quarter. But is it just the weather?  [ download article only ] 

  • Part-time Employment Trends: An Update.  May 2014 (447K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Economic Digest last tackled the topic of part-time employment in 1997. Therein it asked "are these newly created jobs mostly part-time (1 to 34 hours), with relatively low paying wages?" The tepid post-recession recovery we are currently experiencing has many people asking those same questions again. Fortunately, data availability has improved since the 1990s and this article will highlight state-level measures of earnings and hours worked to help answer those questions about the Connecticut economy. [ download article only ]  

  • A Look Back at Connecticut's (Exhausted) UI Claimants February 2014  (335K) Pg.1-5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Economist, Department of Labor, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    Over three and a half years since the end of the Great Recession, Connecticut's unemployment rate remains persistently high. Nationally, long term unemployment as a share of total unemployment at 37.3% is down from its 2010 peak of 45%, but still much higher than prerecession levels. Who are these long-term unemployed? How many have returned to the job market and with what success? This article attempts to shed light on these and other questions. [ download article only ]  

  • The Monthly Snapshot Is Not the Whole Picture.  October 2013 (344K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Labor markets are more dynamic than revealed in the monthly tallies of changes in employment levels. Two additional sets of indicators – the Business Employment Dynamics (BED)1 and the Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWI)2 help illuminate the workings of the economy and labor market.

    Each month, the Department of Labor reports a snapshot of current employment which can be compared to the level of employment in a previous period, for example the previous year or the previous month. As the table at the top of page 6 shows, in August Connecticut employment fell by 6,000 jobs from July but increased 15,400 from August 2012. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Migration Patterns.  August 2013 (418K) 4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Examining interstate migration patterns provides an interesting view of where new Nutmeggers are coming from and where former Connecticut residents are going. Table 1 shows the ten largest sources of Connecticut inflow migration. The bordering states of New York and Massachusetts had the largest combined share of total inflow to the state at 39 percent of total inflows. Together with the third largest inflow state of Florida, those three states totaled 45 percent of flows into Connecticut. These three states since 2005 have consistently comprised the top three inflow origins to Connecticut. Overall inflow to the state in 2011 was 73,607 new residents. From 2005 through 2011 inflow peaked in 2006 at 88,518 new residents. [ download article only ]  

  • Job Polarization in Connecticut.  December 2012 (185K) Pg.1,2 & 5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, DOL, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    In recent months, much has been written of the hollowing out of the middle class during the recovery. A New York Times article partially attributes this to longterm trends of automation and globalization that cause a polarization of labor to high and low wage employment. The same article extensively reports on the findings by The National Employment Law Project (NELP). Their work analyzed nationwide Current Population Survey (CPS) data and found middle wage jobs incurred a majority of job losses during the recession, while lowwage jobs experienced a majority of post-recession job growth. The report also found the share of high wage job losses and subsequent gains to be 19 and 20 percent. [ download article only ]  

  • Youth Employment Patterns Revisited. September 2012  (198K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Last summer, the Connecticut Economic Digest published an article on youth employment in Connecticut. It used wage and Department of Motor Vehicles records to illustrate employment change by industry from the second to third quarter of 2007 and 2010. The article noted that youth employment declined at nearly three times the rate of overall Connecticut employment. This summer, the Census Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWI) dataset has been examined to provide a more detailed and longer-term analysis of labor market changes for youths in Connecticut. The analysis provides more detail as to how the recession has affected the state's youngest segment of the labor force and analyzes long-term trends that help indicate the direction we are heading a full 3 years into the NBER-declared recovery. [ download article only ]  

  • Is Connecticut a Small Business State? May 2012  (329K) Pg.1-5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Economist, Department of Labor, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    A widely held belief is small businesses create most of the new jobs. Given the recent recession and slow recovery, there is a lot of interest in job creation and policies to promote economic growth. Using a newly available data set from the U.S. Census, this article explores the notion of job creation by both firm age and firm size, and seeks to provide some clarity on the underlying dynamics of Connecticut's labor market.

    The Business Dynamics Statistics (BDS) produced by the U.S. Census Bureau is compiled using the Census Bureau's Business Register. The Business Register covers establishments of all domestic businesses including the self-employed, but excluding private households and governments. The BDS dataset tabulates data at the establishment level (an establishment is a fixed physical location where economic activity takes place). Establishments all belong to firms (a firm may be the parent of one establishment or multiple establishments). When analyzing BDS data for Connecticut it is important to note that though the establishments are all based within Connecticut, parent firms for Connecticut's establishments can be located anywhere in the nation. [ download article only ]  

  • Employment Patterns and Structural Unemployment April 2012  (419K) Pg.3-4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The recent recession has raised the question of structural unemployment's contribution to the stubbornly high unemployment rates that have thus far typified the recovery period. Structural change—the permanent relocation of workers from some industries to others, is a dynamic process that occurs throughout business cycles [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut's UI Exhaustees: Where Are They Now? * November 2011  (351K) Pg.1-3, 5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Economist, Department of Labor, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    The recession of the late 2000's is the worst to hit the United States since the depression of the 1930's. Nineteen months after the official completion of Connecticut's recession, the unemployment rate is still stubbornly stuck around 9%. Based on data from the Current Employment Survey (CES), it is estimated about 119,000 jobs were lost in Connecticut through December 2009. Connecticut gained 24,300 jobs from January 2010, the end of Connecticut's recession, to January 2011. However, from January 2011 to July 2011, only about 8,500 jobs have been created. At the current level of job growth, it will take many years to employ those laid off by the recession. [ download article only ]

    * This a partial reprint of "Following Connecticut's Unemployment Insurance Claimants Through the Recession," by Manisha Srivastava, DOL, October 2011. For the full report, including an analysis on the demographics of current claimants, download: http://www1.ctdol.state.ct.us/lmi/pubs/ConnecticutUIClaimants.pdf

  • Youth Employment in Connecticut. July 2011  (419K) Pg.3
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    For many, summer is a time for relaxation. The season is typified by sunny weather, family vacations, barbeques and trips to the beach. However, the season also represents a young workers initiation into the labor force. Be it work as a camp counselor, lifeguard, salesperson or waitress, those summer jobs teach youths valuable skills they will carry with them onto enhanced employment opportunities later in life. Unfortunately, for a growing number of American youths, these jobs are increasingly hard to find. [ download article only ]  

  • A New Approach to Analyzing the Gender Wage Gap. April 2011  (415K) Pg.1-3,&5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Economist, Department of Labor, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    "Equal Pay Day" takes place on a Tuesday in April (April 12th this year), symbolizing how far into the workweek women must work to earn what men earned the previous week. The gender wage gap is calculated by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS), and is based on data collected through surveys. This article takes a new approach to understanding the gender wage gap using wage records from Connecticut's Unemployment Insurance (UI) program. The gender wage gap is analyzed by age group and in further detail for select industries, with interesting implications for policy makers. [ download article only ] 

  • The Face of the Long-Term Unemployed. November 2010 (473K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Manisha Srivastava, CCT Economist, Department of Labor Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    After much political debate, Congress approved extending unemployment insurance benefits for the long-term unemployed until November 30, 2010. The extended Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) program is 100% federally funded. This is in contrast to the regular Unemployment Compensation (UC) program that is fully State funded. The EUC program is a newly created program as of June 30, 2008 in response to the current financial crisis. It is the first time in the 75-year history of UC that benefits have been extended for up to 99 weeks. [ download article only ] 

  • A 2010 LANDING? The Connecticut Employment Outlook to 2010 June 2009, (414K) Pg.1.

  • Area Employment Projections to 2008. April 2001, (230K) Pg.4.

  • A short look at long-term employment projections. April 1998, (207K) Pg.1, 4.

  • Connecticut Employment Outlook to 2007. June 2006, (590K) Pg.1.

  • Connecticut Employment Outlook to 2008. June 2007, (235K) Pg.1-5.

  • Connecticut Employment Outlook to Fourth Quarter 2006 June 2005, (541K) Pg.2-5.

  • Connecticut Employment Trends. July 2007, (524K) Pg.1-5.

  • Connecticut Industry Employment Outlook to Fourth Quarter 2003. October 2002, (235K) Pg.1-5.

  • Connecticut Industry Employment Outlook to Second Quarter 2004. April 2003, (236K) Pg.1-5.

  • Connecticut Industry Employment Outlook to Fourth Quarter 2004. June 2004, (229K) Pg.1-5.

  • Connecticut's Investment Employment Rising. March 2007, (544K) Pg.1-5.

  • CT's Multiple Jobholders Rise to 6.3 Percent in 2007 February 2009, (407K) Pg.3.

  • Connecticut's Occupational Structure: A Regional View. May 1999, (273K) Pg.1-2.

  • Continued Employment and Wage Growth in Third Quarter 2000. April 2001, (230K) Pg.7.

  • Connecticut's 2008 Employment Situation, A Tale of Two Trends Aug 2009, (397K) Pg.1.

  • County Trends Examined. August 1999, (188K) Pg.1-4.

  • Defense-Related Employment-Can Connecticut Stop the Decline? February 2005, (643K) Pg.2-5.

  • Defining Employment. May 1999, (273K) Pg.3-4.

  • Employment and wages grew in 1Q97. December 1997, (249K) Pg.1-3.

  • Employment And Wages: Peak To Trough To Present. November 1998, (287K) Pg.1, 3-4.

  • Employment Estimating Methods Evolving. December 2000, (173K) Pg.1-2, 4.

  • Employment Projections: 1998-2008. March 2001, (226K) Pg.1-2, 4.

  • Employment services industry: a harbinger of the economy. May 2006, (495K) Pg.1.

  • Employment trends are analyzed from ES-202 data. December 1996, (233K) Pg.1-3.

  • (Almost) Everything You Wanted to Know About Connecticut’s Employment Numbers... But Were Afraid to Ask. October 2008, (410K) Pg.1-3.

  • Growth in Employment Slowed by Connecticut's Industry Mix. March 2006, (660K) Pg.1.

  • JOBS AND CYCLES: Historical Patterns in Connecticut's Employment Behavior. November 2005, (589K) Pg.1.

  • Modest gain in 2004 UI covered employment. August 2005, (573K) Pg.1-3, 5.

  • Occupational Employment Forecast to 2008. May 2001, (378K) Pg.1-3, 7.

  • Outsourcing: implications for employment. July 2004, (240K) Pg.1-5.

  • Part time story, The. July 1997, (185K) Pg.4.

  • The Bad News, the Not-So-Bad News and the Good News about Connecticut's Unemployment Rate November 2009 (402K) Pg.1-3, 5.

  • The Growth of Self-Employment November 2007, (572K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • Turning Point: Connecticut Employment Outlook to 2009. June 2008, (420K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • UI Covered Employment Approaches a Record Level. November 2000, (181K) Pg.1-4.

  • UI Covered employment continues upward trend in 2006. August 2007, (555K) Pg.1-5.

  • UI Covered Employment Declines in 2001 - First Time in Eight Years August 2002, (247K) Pg.1-5.

  • UI Covered Employment Declines in 2002 - Second Consecutive Year. September 2003, (230K) Pg.1, 5.

  • UI Covered Employment Increases in 2005 - Second Consecutive Year. August 2006, (582K) Pg.1-4.

  • UI Covered Employment Sets New High in 2007. Aug 2008, (412K) Pg.1-3, 5.

  • UI Covered Employment Reaches a New High in 2000. August 2001, (211K) Pg.1-3.

  • UI Covered Employment Sets New Record, Wage Growth Continues. July 2001, (215K) Pg.7.

  • U.S. self-employment rates. October 2004, (335K) Pg.1,5.

top
  • Connecticut Exports: 2016 in Review. April 2017 (326K) Pg.1-3.
    By Laura Jaworski, Office of International and Domestic Affairs, DECD

    Geopolitical issues seemed to dominate 2016, whether it was the U.S. elections, Brexit, the Eurozone, free trade agreements, economic integration or national sovereignty. How these global issues impact trade, currency, and political relationships remains to be seen. In the meantime, to assess Connecticut's export status, a review of several key categories follows.

    Annual Export Figures
    In 2016, Connecticut's commodity exports totaled $14.4 billion, a 5.49% decrease from the $15.24 billion registered in 2015. It is important to note, as significant as commodity exports are, they omit service exports, for which the collection of data is inexact and unavailable at the state level. All U.S. states face this data gap. This means that export figures for a state like Connecticut- with a large concentration of insurance, financial and other services understate the true magnitude of its overall export value.[ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Exports: 2015 in Review. April 2016 (323K) Pg.1-3, 5.
    By Laura Jaworski, Office of International and Domestic Affairs, DECD

    For the first time since 2009, U.S. exports decreased. The weak global economy and strong U.S. dollar, which made U.S. exports more expensive to foreign buyers, brought challenges to the export community and resulted in export declines across the board. To assess Connecticut's export status, a review of several key categories follows.[ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Exports: 2014 in Review. April 2015 (360K) Pg.1-3, 5.
    By Laura Jaworski, Office of International and Domestic Affairs, DECD

    Opening foreign markets to U.S. goods and services is critical for economic competitiveness, growth and job creation. As such, President Obama commenced the second phase of the National Export Initiative, "NEI/NEXT," to strengthen partnerships among the export community. At a May 2014 launch, U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker announced that through NEI/NEXT, federal agencies are developing policy improvements to "provide exporters more tailored assistance and information; streamline export reporting requirements; expand access to export financing; ensure market access and a level playing field; and collaborate with state and local organizations."[ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Exports: 2013 in Review. April 2014 (402K) Pg.1-3, 5.
    By Laura Jaworski, Office of International and Domestic Affairs, DECD

    To assess Connecticut's export status, The Connecticut Economic Digest conducts an annual review of the state's export performance. Exports are a significant contributor to the state's economy - they support and create jobs and spur economic growth. In 2013, Connecticut's commodity exports totaled $16.47 billion, a 3.23% increase from the $15.96 billion registered in 2012. Connecticut was one of 16 states to achieve a new record for exports in 2013, which helped drive the United States to overall record-setting 2013 exports. Since the 2010 launch of President Obama's "National Export Initiative" (NEI), the U.S. has experienced four consecutive years of record exports. Given the correlation between exports and jobs, and that 95% of potential consumers live abroad, trade expansion and increased exports are vital to economic development.[ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Exports: 2012 in Review. April 2013 (423K) Pg.1-3, 5.
    By Laura Jaworski, Office of International and Domestic Affairs, DECD

    Each year The Digest takes a look at Connecticut's annual export performance. Exports are an important contributor to the state's economy, create jobs and spur economic growth. In 2012, Connecticut's commodity exports totaled $15.86 billion, a slight 2.14% decline from the $16.21 billion recorded in 2011. These commodity exports represent approximately 7% of Connecticut's gross state product (state GSP), up from 4.9% of state GSP just ten years earlier in 2002.[ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Exports: 2011 in Review. April 2012 (421K) Pg.1-2, 5.
    By Laura Jaworski, Office of International and Domestic Affairs, DECD

    Exports are an engine of growth and an important contributor to gross domestic product. In Connecticut, commodity exports represent approximately 7% of the gross state product (state GDP). Exports sustain and create jobs and also have a multiplier effect on the economy. Given the fact that 95% of the world's consumers live outside the U.S., it makes sense to pursue foreign market opportunities and reach those consumers, generate new business, create jobs and spur economic growth and recovery. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Exports: 2010 in Review. April 2011 (421K) Pg.1-2, 5.
    By Laura Jaworski, Office of International and Domestic Affairs, DECD

    In a climate of fiscal and budgetary challenges, it is imperative to recognize that export growth is a vehicle to achieve the twin goals of job creation and economic recovery. Exports are an engine of growth and an important contributor to gross domestic product. In Connecticut, commodity exports represent approximately 7% of the gross state product (state GDP). Exports sustain and create jobs and have a multiplier effect on the economy. Given the fact that 95% of the world's consumers live outside the U.S., it makes sense to pursue foreign market opportunities and reach those consumers, generate new business, create jobs and spur economic growth and recovery. Exports are critical for business and economic success. [ download article only ] 

  • Exports: Opportunities for Economic Growth. April 2010 (419K) Pg.1-2, 5.
    By Laura Jaworski, Office of International and Domestic Affairs, DECD

    During his January 2010 State of the Union address, President Obama announced a goal of doubling U.S. exports over the next five years. To reach this goal, the President unveiled a National Export Initiative (NEI) that focuses on three key areas: (1) expanding trade advocacy and educating companies about overseas market opportunities; (2) improving businesses' access to credit and (3) enforcing international trade laws and removing unfair tariff and non-tariff barriers that prevent U.S. companies from entering foreign markets. [ download article only ] 

  • 1998 Exports Reach All-Time High. April 1999, (321K) Pg.1-2, 4.

  • Connecticut Exports - 2006, A Very Good Year. April 2007, (525K) Pg.1-5.

  • Export growth highest in seven years. June 1998, (236K) Pg.1-2.

  • Exports, an Economic Bright Spot: 2008 Connecticut Exports in Review April 2009, (407K) Pg.1.

  • New Gains for Exports: 2005 Connecticut Exports in Review. April 2006, (495K) Pg.1.

  • Recent Connecticut Export Performance Explored. November 2002, (238K) Pg.1-3.

  • The Export Engine: 2007 Connecticut Exports in Review April 2008, (565K) Pg.1-2, 5.

top
  • State's 2016 Housing Market in Review. July 2017 (337K) Pg.1-2,& 5
    By Kolie Sun, Senior Research Analyst, DECD  Kolie.Sun@ct.gov

    The housing market is an important sector of the economy, and so each year the Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) examines different aspects of Connecticut's housing industry. This article takes a look at permits, sales, prices and housing characteristics.

    Home Sales and Prices
    The state's real estate market continued its momentum into 2016 with another strong performance in the number of sales and an uptick in median prices.

    According to the Warren Group report, Connecticut single-family home sales gained 8.7% from 29,644 in 2015 to 32,235 in 2016, the highest level in nine years. Condominium sales also gained ground with a 5.3% increase from 7,853 in 2015 to 8,267 in 2016. [ download article only ] 

  • Anchor Institutions and the Innovation Economy.  June 2017 (336K) Pg.1,2,5
    By Al Sylvestre, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Alan.Sylvestre@ct.gov

    Anchor Institution Characteristics
    Hospitals and institutions of higher learning deploying their considerable resources to promote neighborhood revitalization through economic development are known as anchor institutions. Often acting in concert with nonprofit and public agencies, anchor institutions create opportunities for home ownership among low- and moderate-income households as well as supporting educational and apprenticeship programs for disadvantaged youth to prepare them for gainful employment.

    This article offers a brief look at two prominent Connecticut anchor institutions and others throughout the country as examples of how institutional self-interest and philanthropy have successfully combined to drive the revitalization of the communities that host these institutions. If these institutions continue to be nourished by capital, innovation, and the commitment of community and social resource providers, the possibility remains that impoverished communities can flourish through the perseverance of individuals and institutions that see potential in their neighborhoods. download article only ] 

  • 2015 State Housing Market: Permits Up, Prices Fall. July 2016 (365K) Pg.1-2,& 5
    By Kolie Sun, Senior Research Analyst, DECD  Kolie.Sun@ct.gov

    2015 was a strong year for the U.S. housing market, due to high home sales and rising home prices. Connecticut followed the nation in terms of sales, however, prices continued to fall. The multifamily unit segment became more important than ever in the state's housing industry as demand for multi-units is on the rise. In this annual article, we will examine several aspects of the state's housing sector and the factors leading to an increasing demand for rental units. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Housing Recovery Slowed in 2014. July 2015 (338K) Pg.1-2,& 5
    By Kolie Sun, Senior Research Analyst, DECD  Kolie.Sun@ct.gov

    The state's overall housing recovery that began in 2012 continued, albeit at a slower rate, in 2014. One new positive trend was the increasing demand on multifamily units that sustained the housing sector. In this article, we will examine many aspects of the state's housing industry and the factors leading to a higher demand for multifamily homes. [ download article only ] 

  • State Housing Market Continued its Recovery in 2013. July 2014 (411K) Pg.1-2,& 5
    By Kolie Sun, Senior Research Analyst, DECD  Kolie.Sun@ct.gov

    Connecticut's housing market continued on the path to recovery in 2013 with many economic indicators posting strong gains over the prior year. In this article, we will examine the state's housing industry and factors that led to stronger housing performance in 2013, most notably permits rising to pre-recession levels.  [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut and the Housing Bust: A Tale of Two Bubbles  October 2012 (349K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    On July 18, 2012, the Center for Real Estate and Urban Economic Studies (CREUES) at the University of Connecticut released their study in which they found signs of stabilizing housing prices after more than a year of declines. They found that over the previous year prices had stabilized or increased throughout most of Connecticut's markets, and that those areas with declines also showed improvement with smaller drops. Nationally, in their 2012 report released in June, the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University stated:

    After several false starts, there is reason to believe that 2012 will mark the beginning of a true housing market recovery. Sustained employment growth remains key, providing the stimulus for stronger household growth and bringing relief to some distressed homeowners. They went on to caution: While gaining ground, the homeowner market still faces multiple challenges. If the broader economy weakens in the short term, the housing rebound could again stall. [ download article only ] 

  • State's 2012 Housing Market in Review. July 2013 (344K) Pg.1-2,& 5
    By Kolie Sun, Senior Research Analyst, DECD  Kolie.Sun@ct.gov

    The housing market is an important sector of the economy — it creates jobs, spurs economic growth and impacts our overall quality of life. This article takes a look at many aspects of Connecticut's housing industry and the factors that led to modest housing growth in 2012, despite the fact that permits did not reach prerecession levels.  [ download article only ] 

  • State Housing Market Languished in 2011. July 2012 (419K) Pg.1-2,& 5
    By Kolie Sun, Senior Research Analyst, DECD  Kolie.Sun@ct.gov

    The housing sector continued to be a drag on the economy through 2011 as suggested by a number of indicators, including record-low permit production and weak home sales. This article examines the 2011 housing market from several perspectives and includes some observations. [ download article only ] 

  • State's Housing Market: a Long Road to Recovery. July 2011 (419K) Pg.1-2,& 5
    By Kolie Sun, Senior Research Analyst, DECD  Kolie.Sun@ct.gov

    Housing market activity is one of the barometers of the health of the state and national economies. The anemic housing permit growth, weak home price increases, and fewer residential real estate transactions in 2010 - when coupled with high unemployment, a jobless economic recovery and a rising foreclosure rate - suggest that the state’s housing doldrums may continue. This article examines the housing market from several perspectives. [ download article only ] 

  • State's Housing Troubles Continued in 2009. July 2010 (416K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Kolie Sun, Senior Research Analyst, DECD  Kolie.Sun@ct.gov

    The Connecticut and U.S. economies experienced financial turmoil that began in the fall of 2008 and continued into the Great Recession of 2009. Nearly all sectors felt the adverse impacts of the recession, which resulted in higher unemployment, declining personal income and corporate revenues and weakened consumer confidence. The housing sector is a major contributor to the economic turmoil in 2009, as this analysis of the state's residential permit activities, home prices and foreclosures will clearly show. [ download article only ] 

  • 1998: A Stellar Year for Housing. July 1999, (192K) Pg.1-2.

  • 2007 State Housing Market Continues to Trend Downward. July 2008, (415K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • Connecticut's Housing Industry in 2002: A Look Back. August 2003, (240K) Pg.1, 5.

  • Connecticut's housing market remains healthy. September 2006, (563K) Pg.1-4.

  • Housing 2000: Strong & Steady. July 2001, (215K) Pg.1-2.

  • Housing 2003 - the results are in. September 2004, (226K) Pg.1,5.

  • Housing permits reviewed. June 1997, (177K) Pg.1-3.

  • Housing sector buoyant. May 1998, (257K) Pg.1-2.

  • Housing Sector Remained Strong in 1999. July 2000, (176K) Pg.1-2.

  • Housing Industry Worsened in 2008 July 2009, (416K) Pg.1.

  • Is There a Housing Bubble? September 2005, (640K) Pg.1-3, 5.

  • State Housing Market Cooled in 2006. September 2007, (634K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • The State of the Housing Industry. September 2002, (268K) Pg.4.

top
  • Covered Employment and Wages: A 2016 Annual Review.  August 2017 (264K) Pg.1-5
    By Jonathan Kuchta, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Jonathan.Kuchta@ct.gov

    The number of jobs covered by Connecticut Unemployment Insurance (UI) increased by 0.2 percent during 2016, according to most recent data published from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. This increase continues the trend started in 2011. Total private industry employment, constituting 86.1 percent of the state's employment total, increased by 0.5 percent. Total government employment decreased by 1.4 percent year-over-year.

    Average annual wages for all Connecticut jobs increased by 0.5 percent to $65,869, much like in 2015. In 2016, private sector wages increased by 0.4 percent to $66,579; government wages increased 0.9 percent to $61,458.

    The number of business establishments expanded for the fifth year in a row, with a new total of 117,337, an increase of 0.9 percent over 2015. Total private establishments represented the entirety of the increase, reaching 113,944 in 2016. Government worksites decreased 0.9 percent in the state, from 3,425 in 2015 to 3,393 in 2016. [ download article only ]

  • A New Look at Earnings Inequality. April 2017 (326K) Pg.4-5.
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    There is a great deal of literature documenting the increase in income inequality in the United States from the mid-1970s to the present. Data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) show similar trends. In a recent presentation, Dr. James R. Spletzer of the U.S. Census Bureau reviewed this data and presented new findings using data from the Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD).[ download article only ] 

  • Long Term Industry and Occupational Projections: 2014-2024.  September 2016 (354K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, DOL, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov and Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, DOL, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    NATIONAL PROJECTIONS ~ Every two years, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics produces 10 year projections of the U.S. labor force and employment by industry and occupation. The latest projections are for the period 2014 to 2024.

    Labor Force ~ The U.S. labor force is projected to increase by 9.8 million workers from 2014 to 2024 (a 0.6% annualized growth rate) with the 2024 labor force projected to be older and more diverse. The number of workers aged 55 and older is expected to increase by more than 6.7 million (+19.8%) while the number aged 16 to 24 is projected to decrease by 2.8 million (-13.1%) with the largest labor force cohort – those aged 25 to 54 (also known as prime-age workers) up just 3.9 million (+3.9%). As a percent of the labor force, the 16-24 cohort will fall 2.1 percentage points to 14.1% in 2024; increased postsecondary enrollment is a primary cause of this share decrease. [ download article only ] 

  • Covered Employment and Wages: A 2015 Annual Review.  August 2016 (328K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Jonathan Kuchta, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Jonathan.Kuchta@ct.gov

    The number of jobs in Connecticut covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) increased by 0.6 percent during 2015, according to most recent data published from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. This increase continues the trend started back in 2011. Total private industry employment, constituting 85.9 percent of the state's employment total, increased by 0.8 percent. Government employment decreased by 0.6 percent year-over-year. [ download article only ]  

  • Covered Employment and Wages: A 2014 Annual Review.  August 2015 (345K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Jonathan Kuchta, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Jonathan.Kuchta@ct.gov

    The number of workers in Connecticut covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) increased by 0.8 percent during 2014, according to most recent data published from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. This increase continues the trend started back in 2011. Total private industry employment, constituting 85.7 percent of the State's covered employment total, increased by 0.9 percent. Government employment increased by 0.3 percent year-over-year. [ download article only ]  

  • Construction Occupational Employment Trend, 2005-2013. August 2015 (345K) Pg.4.
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The bursting of the housing bubble hit certain areas of the economy harder than others. Though Connecticut was not an epicenter of the housing bubble and bust, its impact can be seen when examining construction occupational employment. This article uses data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS) as it provides estimates of labor market variables not captured in other datasets, including unemployment by occupation and prior occupation of those not in the labor force. From this we can get a generalized idea of how construction occupations in Connecticut have fared during the recession and recovery.[ download article only ] 

  • Examining Education, Incomes, and the "Skills Gap".  June 2015 (280K) Pg.1-3, 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    While the unemployment rate has dropped sharply over the past few years, it remains higher than it was before the "great recession" began. On the other hand, the number and rate of job openings are higher than their prerecession levels. In March, there were five million job openings nationally despite an unemployment rate of 5.4%, a percentage point higher than prevailed in 2006 and 2007. Despite the pool of unemployed job-seekers, some business groups report that their members are having difficulty hiring employees with the skills and experience they are seeking. This has led some to conclude that there is a gap between the skills available in the labor force and the needs of employers. [ download article only ] 

  • A Review of 2004-2014 Employment Projections.  June 2015 (280K) Pg.4
    By Michael Fitzgerald, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Michael.Fitzgerald@ct.gov

    It will be years—not in my time—before a woman will become Prime Minister." That's a quote made by Margaret Thatcher in 1969, ten years before she took over as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in 1979. In other words, projections—especially 10 years ahead of time—are difficult. Every two years, the Office of Research at the Connecticut Department of Labor creates 10-year employment projections for the state. Now that employment statistics for 2014 have been released, we are going to take a look at the 2004-2014 projections and see how well the projections fared. Statewide numbers for the Major Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) groupings and Occupation Employment Statistics data from 2014 will be what is focused on. There are a couple of things to bear in mind when looking at the original projections. [ download article only ] 

  • Occupational Employment and Wages: 2001-2013. April 2015 (360K) Pg.4.
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) estimates employer survey information into detailed wage data for 821 occupations that comprise 22 major categories. Extensive occupational earnings data make the survey useful to both employers and employees. This article utilizes data from 2001, 2004, 2007, 2010, and 2013 to account for the 3-year OES survey cycle. Data is examined mostly at 2-digit Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) level but also dives deeper into 6 digit levels to explain broader changes.[ download article only ] 

  • Income Inequality, Poverty, and Labor Markets.  February 2015 (297K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    A large part of the current political and economic discussion and debate has been centered on the growing concentration of wealth and income over the last 30 years or so. And this trend has accelerated over the current recovery. Another issue is Poverty, a major consequence of extreme inequality. Therefore, addressing the issues of Poverty requires an understanding of the broader issue of Inequality. With that in mind, the remainder of the discussion will address the 30-year trend of rising Economic Inequality, especially in the U.S., what seems to be driving it, and its connection with labor markets. It will conclude with spotlighting a uniquely American phenomenon that exacerbates the inequality problem: Urban Sprawl. [ download article only ] 

  • The Minimum Wage Debate: 2014 Update.  November 2014 (364K) Pg.1-5
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, Department of Labor Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    INTRODUCTION: The Minimum Wage Debate — Back with a Vengeance The first version of this article, "The Minimum Wage Debate: The Latest Rounds", appeared in the January 1999 issue of the Connecticut Economic Digest. It was motivated by Connecticut's new minimum-wage increase that went into effect January 1, 1999. It raised the State's minimum wage to $5.65 per hour, and then to $6.15 on January 1, 2000 (or to a value that was indexed to the Federal minimum wage, whichever is greater). Although there was not much opposition in Connecticut, it did spark a national debate and some vocal Congressional opposition, when President Clinton proposed raising the Federal minimum wage. Well, it's Baaack! [ download article only ] 

  • Long Term Industry and Occupational Projections: 2012-2022.  September 2014 (410K) Pg.1-5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Every two years the Connecticut Department of Labor produces and publishes ten year projections by industry and occupation. This year's projections cover the period 2012-2022, which invites a comparison to the previous ten year period. The 2002-2012 period spans the global financial and economic crisis that caused the worst national recession since the Great Depression. While employment started to increase after the first quarter of 2010, by 2012 employment in many industries was still below 2002 levels. Importantly, the industries that grew the most after the recovery started were not necessarily the same as those that lost the most during the recession, so the industry and occupational mix of the economy has changed. The long term projections help put these changes into perspective and peek over the horizon to see what the industry and occupational profile of the economy would look like if full employment could be achieved within the next decade. [ download article only ] 

  • Covered Employment and Wages: A 2013 Annual Review.  August 2014 (418K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Jonathan Kuchta, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Jonathan.Kuchta@ct.gov

    The number of workers in Connecticut covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI)increased by 0.7 percent during 2013, according to most recent data published from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. This increase built upon the 1.0 percent increase in both 2012 and 2011. Total private industry employment, constituting 85.7 percent of the State's employment total [little changed from 2012's 85.5], increased by 1.0 percent. Government employment decreased by 0.5 percent over the year. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut Occupational Employment and Wages in 2013.  October 2013 (349K) Pg.4
    By Michael Fitzgerald, CCT Research Analyst, Department of Labor Michael.Fitzgerald@ct.gov

    The 2013 estimates from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Program were recently released. The estimates show Connecticut's total nonfarm employment at 1,620,620. The two largest occupations in the state are Retail Salespersons (50,070) and Cashiers (39,050), comprising 3.1% and 2.4% of total employment, respectively. The remaining top ten occupations are Registered Nurses; Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive; General and Operations Managers; Customer Service Representatives; Waiters and Waitresses; Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeepers; Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food; and Office Clerks, General. These occupations represent just under 20% of total employment in the state. Ninety-two percent of the employees in the ten largest occupations are employed in the private sector. The percentages range from nearly 100% private employment for Retail Salespersons to 74% for Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners. The overall percentage of private employment in the state is slightly lower at 85%. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Private Sector Hours and Earnings: Working to Get Back to Normal.  February 2013 (348K) Pg.1-5
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, DOL Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov

    In 2007, just prior to the start of the "Great Recession," the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released a new series tracking hours and earnings for all private workers. The data are available for the U.S. and states for the aggregated private sector and major private industry divisions.

    The series was developed because the traditional production worker hours and earnings estimates, produced since 1939 for war planning purposes in the goods-producing industries (construction and manufacturing), no longer captured the U.S. economy. Service-providing sectors were now adding the greater part of the new jobs and output in the globalized 21st century. The monthly estimates (average hourly length of the private sector workweek, average hourly private pay rates, and the average weekly private earnings) are samplebased, and have not yet been officially seasonally adjusted by the BLS. A total private level only estimate (no industry supersectors) is also being calculated for Connecticut's six BLS-recognized labor market areas (LMAs). The new all employee private payroll data, after several years of availability, are starting to give some useful approximations of general workforce trends in the states. download article only ] 

  • Unemployment Insurance Covered Employment and Wages: 2011 Annual Review.  August 2012 (418K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Edward T. Doukas, Jr., Research Analyst, Department of Labor Edward.Doukas@ct.gov

    The number of workers in Connecticut covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) laws increased by 1.0 percent during 2011, according to data derived through the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. The 2011 increase reversed the trend over the previous two years when annual average employment declined; down 1.2 percent in 2010 and 4.3 percent in 2009. Total private industry employment, accounting for 85.3 percent of the State's employment total, increased by 1.6 percent, while government employment fell by 1.9 percent. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut Occupational Employment and Wages in 2012.  August 2012 (418K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Lisa Castagna, DOL, Lisa.Castagna@ct.gov) & Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The recently released statistics by the Office of Research in the Connecticut Department of Labor showed that retail salespersons (50,190) and cashiers (39,640) were the occupations with the highest employment in Connecticut. These two occupations combined made up nearly 6 percent of total Connecticut employment. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Personal Income: Forecast for 2012. July 2010  (416K) Pg.3
    By Daniel W. Kennedy, Ph.D., Senior Economist, DOL Daniel.Kennedy@ct.gov

    On September 22, 2011, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) released state personal income for the second quarter of 2011. Connecticut's (CT), current dollar, seasonally adjusted quarterly personal income (QPI) was $206.408 billion for the second quarter of 2011 (2011Q2). This was up by $2.522 billion, or 1.24% from 2011Q1, and up by $9.694 billion, or 4.93% from 2010Q2. The second quarter QPI number had been revised downward by $1.632 billion to $203.886 billion from the initial estimate of $205.518 billion published in the June 2011 release. download article only ]

  • Covered Employment and Wages: 2010 Annual Review.  August 2011 (412K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Edward T. Doukas, Jr., Research Analyst, Department of Labor Edward.Doukas@ct.gov

    Employment in Connecticut covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) decreased by 1.2 percent during 2010, according to preliminary figures that recently became available through the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. While 2010 recorded the second consecutive drop in annual average employment, the rate of decline was less than in 2009 when covered employment dropped by 4.3 percent. Total private industry employment, constituting 84.8 percent of the State's employment total, decreased by 1.1 percent, while government employment fell by 1.7 percent. [ download article only ]  

  • A New Approach to Analyzing the Gender Wage Gap. April 2011  (185K) Pg.1-3,&5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Economist, Department of Labor Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    "Equal Pay Day" takes place on a Tuesday in April (April 12th this year), symbolizing how far into the workweek women must work to earn what men earned the previous week. The gender wage gap is calculated by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS), and is based on data collected through surveys. This article takes a new approach to understanding the gender wage gap using wage records from Connecticut's Unemployment Insurance (UI) program. The gender wage gap is analyzed by age group and in further detail for select industries, with interesting implications for policy makers. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut Employment and Wages: A 2009 Review.  August 2010 (411K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Edward T. Doukas, Jr., Research Analyst, Department of Labor Edward.Doukas@ct.gov

    The recessionary impacts on Connecticut's economy that began being felt during the second half of 2008 took full effect in 2009. Connecticut's Unemployment Insurance (UI) covered employment dropped 4.3 percent during 2009. Records going back as far as 1969 show 2009's percentage decline was the second largest only behind the 5 percent drop that occurred during 1991. Another indicator of the economic woes the State faced in 2009 was that the average annual wage of Connecticut workers ($57,755) decreased from the previous year ($58,334). A review of data dating back as far as 1969 shows that this was only the second time this anomaly has occurred. The only other year that annual pay per employee decreased was 2002. [ download article only ]  

  • CT Personal Income Pulls Through in First Quarter. July 2010  (416K) Pg.3
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, Department of Labor Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov & Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, Department of Labor Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Connecticut personal income growth at 0.6% trailed national personal income growth of 0.9% and New England income growth of 0.8% in the first quarter of 2010. Personal income of $193.037 billion (current dollars, quarterly annualized rate) was the second consecutive quarterly increase, after increasing 0.3% in the fourth quarter of 2009, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). Comparable and adjacent states like New York (0.9%), New Jersey (0.8%), Massachusetts (0.7%), Maryland (0.8%), Pennsylvania (0.8%) and Rhode Island (0.9%) all experienced slightly faster growth than Connecticut during the first quarter. Connecticut ranked 44th by state, in the lowest quintile, in this quarter's personal income growth. [ download article only ]  

  • New Hours and Earnings Data Available. March 2010  (423K) Pg.3
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, Department of Labor Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov

    After three years of exploratory development at the Office of Research, real-time monthly hours and earnings estimates for all private industries in the state and the six largest Connecticut labor market areas have been formally introduced. These newly available All Employee Hours and Earnings series from the employer payroll survey include the average hourly earnings, the average weekly hours employed, and the total average weekly earnings for most of Connecticut's private sector nonfarm workforce. [ download article only ]  

  • 2002 Connecticut Personal Income. June 2003, (220K) Pg.1-3.

  • A Primer on Personal Income. December 2001, (238K) Pg.1-3.

  • An Uneven Recovery, 1993-97. February 2000, (176K) Pg.1-4.

  • CONNECTICUT: A Net Exporter of Labor Services - Implications for Income Growth. November 2006, (652K) Pg.1-5.

  • Connecticut earnings: a look at income from current production. December 2003, (222K) Pg.1-3,5.

  • Connecticut Personal Income Continues to Climb in 2007 May 2008, (421K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • CT Personal Income Grew 1.0 Percent in 2Q 2008. November 2008, (415K) Pg.5.

  • Connecticut Personal Income Growth Slows in 2008 May 2009, (403K) Pg.1.

  • Connecticut's wage rates among the highest in New England. June 1998, (236K) Pg.3-4.

  • Earnings by industry in the nineties. October 1997, (243K) Pg.1-4.

  • Minimum Wage Debate: The Latest Rounds. January 1999, (281K) Pg.3-4.

  • Our sources of income are changing. September 1996, (371K) Pg.1-3.

  • What does that job pay? September 1996, (371K) Pg.4.

top
  • Robots in the Workplace: Threat or Asset?  July 2017 (337K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    The latest breakthroughs in robotics and artificial intelligence have awakened fears that technological advances will lead to a large decrease in the overall level of employment and widespread unemployment. While there will be disruptions, and many occupations are at high risk of computerization over the next decade or two, the dynamic labor market continues to create opportunities for workers with the right skills and education. .  [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities in 2015.  February 2017 (334K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    Connecticut lost 44 lives to work injuries in 2015. With an increase from 2014's revised count of 35, this is the biggest loss since 2010. It is also above Connecticut's annual average of 39 work-related deaths. Nationally, a total of 4,836 fatal workplace injuries occurred in 2015. This was a slight increase from 2014's reported 4,821 deaths. However, the rate of fatalities per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers fell from 3.43 in 2014 to 3.38 in 2015. [ download article only ] 

  • Business Formation in Connecticut: 2000-2015.  August 2016 (328K) Pg.4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Secretary of the State's office maintains records of all business entities in the state. From these records, an aggregation of business type and location has produced interesting data on business formation change in Connecticut over time. This information is available publicly from 1980 to 2015 by business entity type and geographically down to town levels. This article examines business formation change from 2000-2015 and shows how recent cyclical factors have impacted business development in the state. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities, 1992-2014.  December 2015 (433K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    Throughout our history, the American worker has labored not only to erect buildings and cities, but also to raise the standards of our Nation's workplaces. Through protests and picket lines, by organizing and raising their voices together, workers have won small and large victories that have pushed our country closer to ensuring safer and healthier jobs for all.

    Across the United States, as dedicated Americans clock in at factories, walk onto construction sites, put on their hospital uniforms, and report to do the daily work that drives our Nation's progress, they give meaning to the simple yet profound belief that if you work hard and take responsibility, you can get ahead. However, each year millions of people have their shifts cut short by work-related injuries and illnesses, and on average, 12 Americans lose their lives on the job every day." - President Barack Obama

    In 2014, America lost 4,679 people to work-related deaths. Thirty-three of those deaths were in Connecticut. Connecticut's "low" number is primarily due to low employment in high-risk industries. However, it cannot be stressed enough that what is statistically unremarkable has a devastating impact on loved ones. One work-related death is one too many. [ download article only ] 

  • The Economic Impact of Tourism in Connecticut. May 2015 (367K) Pg.1-5
    Tourism Economics - Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development

    Tourism is an important economic engine in Connecticut, and all business sectors in the state economy benefit from tourism activity directly and/or indirectly. Visitors to Connecticut represent a significant economic benefit as they spend money in the local economy on items such as lodging, food and beverage, retail purchases, and recreation. Visitor spending has an even larger impact as it ripples through the statewide economy, generating revenues and jobs for businesses spanning a wide range of industries. Since the recession, Connecticut's tourism industry has created 5,000 new jobs. Visitors to Connecticut spent $8.3 billion in 2013, generating a total economic impact of $14.0 billion, supporting nearly 119,000 total jobs.[ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities, 1992-2013.  December 2014 (433K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    "No one should have to sacrifice their life for their livelihood, because a nation built on the dignity of work must provide safe working conditions for its people." –Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez In 2013, work injuries claimed the lives of 4,405 workers in America. Twenty-six of those deaths occurred in Connecticut.

    Since 1992, the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics has conducted the annual Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) to document workplace fatalities. Connecticut averages 39 workrelated fatalities annually with a high of 57 in 1998. In 2013, Connecticut saw the lowest recorded number of 26 lost workers. This "low" number is not statistically notable and cannot be attributed to a specific cause. However, it cannot be stressed enough that what is statistically unremarkable has a devastating impact on loved ones. One workrelated death is one too many. As Dr. David Michaels, the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, states, "Making a living shouldn't have to cost you your life. Workplace fatalities, injuries, and illnesses are preventable. Safe jobs happen because employers make the choice to fulfill their responsibilities and protect their workers." [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Bioscience Industry: An Update.  February 2012 (415K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Stan McMillen, Ph.D., Managing Economist, DECD, Stan.McMillen@ct.gov & Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    The "Bioscience Connecticut" initiative that emerged in May 2011 is an $864 million investment that intends to make the University of Connecticut's Health Center (UCHC) a hub of research and clinical work in bioscience. This initiative reinforces the state's ongoing and renewed commitment to make Connecticut a leader in the bioscience industry. The "Bioscience Connecticut" initiative anticipates creating 3,000 jobs annually from 2012 through 2018 in the construction of a new patient tower and ambulatory care facility and renovations to existing research facilities. The plan estimates the creation of 16,400 jobs through 2037, a doubling of federal and industry research grants, as well as increased access to high quality health care, increased medical and dental school enrollments (+30%) and an increase in the number of primary and specialty care clinicians to meet forecasted workforce shortages and increased demand for healthcare services.  [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Defense-Related Industry: Spending, Employment, and Dependency  September 2011 (421K) Pg.1-3, 5
    By Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    This article examines how Connecticut's defense industry has fared in recent years and how much the overall state economy depends on it. When last reported in this publication (August 1996 and February 2005), from 1985 to 1995 U.S. federal defense procurement had dropped precipitously by 43% from $179 billion in 1985 to $101 billion in 1995. It was $327.5 billion in federal fiscal year (FFY) 2009. This was in part attributable to the "peace dividend" following the end of the Cold War. In Connecticut defense procurement also dropped significantly over the same period by 64%, from $7.1 billion to $2.5 billion (in fixed 1992 dollars). This trend has been thoroughly reversed by one of the largest surges in national security spending in the state's history. [ download article only ]  

  • Manufacturing Isn't Dead: It Doesn't Even Look That Way!  April 2011 (421K) Pg.3
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Some have erroneously declared manufacturing "dead," particularly in a state like Connecticut that has seen manufacturing's share of total employment fall nearly in half in the past twenty years. But this pronouncement is not just "premature" (to quote Mark Twain) but completely unwarranted. While a smaller share of total employment, manufacturing is and will continue to be a vital component of Connecticut's economy and labor market, and Connecticut will remain a place where manufacturers can grow and prosper. [ download article only ]  

  • A detailed look at Connecticut industry in 2003. August 2004, (228K) Pg.1,5.

  • Aerospace. August 2001, (211K) Pg.5.

  • Business Services - Assisting Connecticut's Economy. January 2003, (248K) Pg.3-4.

  • Child Day Care Services. December 2001, (238K) Pg.5.

  • Computer services industry expanding at a Pentium speed. November 1997, (227K) Pg.3 - 4.

  • Connecticut Agriculture: A Growing Industry. June 1999, (311K) Pg.3-4.

  • Connecticut Industry Employment Mid-Term Outlook to Second Quarter 2006. November 2004, (230K) Pg.1-3,5.

  • Connecticut industry employment outlook to fourth quarter 2004. November 2003, (222K) Pg.5.

  • Connecticut Manufacturing - Is There Reason for Optimism? April 2000, (179K) Pg.1-4.

  • Connecticut's Bioscience Industry: A Brief History. May 2007, (545K) Pg.1-5.

  • Connecticut's Drug Sector: Healthy, Wealthy, and Getting Wiser. October 1998, (290K) Pg.1- 4.

  • Connecticut's Film Tax Credit: An Analysis of the First-Year Impact. July 2008, (415K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • Connecticut's international seaports and airport. February 1998, (238K) Pg.1-2.

  • Construction Strikes Back. September 2000, (183K) Pg.1-4.

  • Eat, drink and be merry- (restaurant) industry is companion to the economy. January 1998, (227K) Pg.3-4.

  • Employment in private defense-related industries drops again in 1995. August 1996, (323K) Pg.4.

  • Government Sector Trends. February 2002, (207K) Pg.1-2.

  • Growth Momentum September 2001, (233K) Pg.5.

  • Health services employment undergoes change. April 1997, (316K) Pg.1-4.

  • Highlighting Connecticut's growing plastics industry. February 1997, (303K) Pg.3.

  • Information Technology Helps Pace Job Growth. October 1999, (281K) Pg.1- 4.

  • Instruments and Related Products. June 2002, (232K) Pg.5.

  • Insurance Carriers and Agents. April 2002, (228K) Pg.1-5.

  • Keep Connecticut's Home FIRE Burning. June 2000, (184K) Pg.1- 4.

  • Local and Interurban Transit. December 2002, (238K) Pg.5.

  • Machinery industry examined. January 1997, (315K) Pg.1-3.

  • Much Ado About Services. December 1999, (182K) Pg.1-4.

  • Retail: Help Wanted! December 1998, (285K) Pg.1-4.

  • Security and Commodity Brokerages. February 2001, (231K) Pg.5.

  • State Wholesale Trade Examined. February 2001, (231K) Pg.1-2.

  • Transportation and Public Utilities: Economics in Motion August 2000, (180K) Pg.1-2, 4.

  • Which Industries are Important to Connecticut? October 2000, (184K) Pg.1-4.

top
  • Robots in the Workplace: Threat or Asset?  July 2017 (337K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    The latest breakthroughs in robotics and artificial intelligence have awakened fears that technological advances will lead to a large decrease in the overall level of employment and widespread unemployment. While there will be disruptions, and many occupations are at high risk of computerization over the next decade or two, the dynamic labor market continues to create opportunities for workers with the right skills and education. .  [ download article only ] 

  • Anchor Institutions and the Innovation Economy.  June 2017 (336K) Pg.1,2,5
    By Al Sylvestre, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Alan.Sylvestre@ct.gov

    Anchor Institution Characteristics
    Hospitals and institutions of higher learning deploying their considerable resources to promote neighborhood revitalization through economic development are known as anchor institutions. Often acting in concert with nonprofit and public agencies, anchor institutions create opportunities for home ownership among low- and moderate-income households as well as supporting educational and apprenticeship programs for disadvantaged youth to prepare them for gainful employment.

    This article offers a brief look at two prominent Connecticut anchor institutions and others throughout the country as examples of how institutional self-interest and philanthropy have successfully combined to drive the revitalization of the communities that host these institutions. If these institutions continue to be nourished by capital, innovation, and the commitment of community and social resource providers, the possibility remains that impoverished communities can flourish through the perseverance of individuals and institutions that see potential in their neighborhoods. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Bioscience Industry: An Update.  February 2012 (415K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Stan McMillen, Ph.D., Managing Economist, DECD, Stan.McMillen@ct.gov & Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    The "Bioscience Connecticut" initiative that emerged in May 2011 is an $864 million investment that intends to make the University of Connecticut's Health Center (UCHC) a hub of research and clinical work in bioscience. This initiative reinforces the state's ongoing and renewed commitment to make Connecticut a leader in the bioscience industry. The "Bioscience Connecticut" initiative anticipates creating 3,000 jobs annually from 2012 through 2018 in the construction of a new patient tower and ambulatory care facility and renovations to existing research facilities. The plan estimates the creation of 16,400 jobs through 2037, a doubling of federal and industry research grants, as well as increased access to high quality health care, increased medical and dental school enrollments (+30%) and an increase in the number of primary and specialty care clinicians to meet forecasted workforce shortages and increased demand for healthcare services.  [ download article only ] 

  • 12th Business Training Network Focuses on Attracting Maritime Workers. January 2003, (248K) Pg.7.

  • 1999 Legislation Planned. February 1999, (429K) Pg.3.

  • Access 2001 Winners Named. December 2001, (238K) Pg.7.

  • Aerospace Core Created. January 2000, (176K) Pg.3.

  • Agriculture Announced as State's Newest Cluster. May 2002, (203K) Pg.7.

  • A Look at Connecticut's Industry Clusters. October 2005, (570K) Pg.1.

  • Bioscience Leader Pfizer - a Catalyst in New London. October 2001, (238K) Pg.7.

  • BioScience Update. April 2001, (230K) Pg.3.

  • Bio-tech cluster advances. August 1998, (177K) Pg.3.

  • Bradley at Crossroads. June 2000, (184K) Pg.3.

  • Business Training Grants. November 1999, (194K) Pg.3.

  • Call for 2002 Inner City Entrepreneurship Award Entries. November 2001, (237K) Pg.7.

  • China trade impacts state. July 1998, (397K) Pg.3.

  • Cities Championed. July 2000, (176K) Pg.3.

  • Cluster Activation. February 2000, (176K) Pg.3.

  • "Cluster-Based" Exports Proposed. September 1998, (272K) Pg.3.

  • "Cluster Bill" passes both houses. June 1998, (236K) Pg.3.

  • Cluster Initiative recognized. June 2003, (220K) Pg.5.

  • Cluster Supply Chains. April 1999, (321K) Pg.3.

  • Connecticut Emerging as "Hot Spot" for Bioscience and Information Technology. May 2002, (203K) Pages 4-5.

  • Connecticut Information Technology: Powering the Economy. May 2003, (253K) Pg.1-5.

  • Connecticut Receives Top Honors At ICIC-INC Magazine Inner City 100 Ceremony. June 2002, (232K) Pg.7.

  • CT Scores Straight A's on National Economic Development Report Card. January 2002, (226K) Pg.3.

  • CURE Leads Bioscience. November 1998, (287K) Pg.3.

  • DECD Recognized for Economic Development Efforts. April 2002, (228K) Pg.3.

  • Economic Board Convened. December 1998, (285K) Pg.3.

  • Entrepreneurship Awards. June 2001, (375K) Pg.3.

  • Exports Up 1.5 Percent. October 1998, (290K) Pg.3.

  • First Business Training Network to Enter Phase Two Development July 2002, (239K) Pg.7.

  • Focus on Bradley. January 2001, (249K) Pg.3.

  • Going Global. October 2000, (184K) Pg.3.

  • Grant Establishes Greater Valley Manufacturing Training Network. October 2002, (235K) Pg.7.

  • Human Resources. September 1999, (178K) Pg.3.

  • Industry clusters report to governor. July 1997, (185K) Pg.1-3.

  • Industry clusters revisited. October 1996, (305K) Pg.1-3.

  • Inner City 10. November 2000, (181K) Pg.3.

  • Insurance and Financial Services Cluster Announced. December 2002, (238K) Pg.7.

  • Lean Manufacturing To Be Promoted. March 1999, (449K) Pg.3.

  • Legislature, Governor Advance Cluster Initiatives. September 2001, (233K) Pg.5.

  • Lights, Sound, Action! Movie, TV and Sound Production in CT. February 2006, (611K) Pg.5.

  • Major Steps Taken in Hartford's Inner City Business Strategy. September 2002, (268K) Pg.7.

  • Manufacturing Progress. April 2000, (179K) Pg.3.

  • Maritime Cluster Outlines Transportation Recommendations. February 2003, (254K) Pg.7.

  • Maritime Launched. March 2001, (226K) Pg.3.

  • Meeting Local Demand. August 1999, (188K) Pg.3.

  • META Leads New Clusters. May 2001, (378K) Pg.3.

  • New Marketing Campaign and Bioscience Office Announced. February 2002, (207K) Pg.3.

  • Out-of-state Executives Impressed with Connecticut August 2002, (247K) Pg.7.

  • Pfizer to build clinical research unit in New Haven. March 2003, (266K) Pg.5.

  • Pilot Financing Program for Bioscience Announced. November 2002, (238K) Pg.7.

  • Progress Reported. January 1999, (281K) Pg.3.

  • Q2 YTD Exports Even. October 1999, (281K) Pg.3.

  • Regional Links. July 1999, (192K) Pg.3.

  • Smart Start Up. August 2000, (180K) Pg.3.

  • Software/IT Announced. December 1999, (182K) Pg.3.

  • Software/IT Success. February 2001, (231K) Pg.3.

  • State Acclaimed. December 2000, (173K) Pg.3.

  • Statewide Call. July 2001, (215K) Pg.3.

  • Teaching Entrepreneurship. August 2001, (211K) Pg.7.

  • The British are Coming! The British are Coming! April 2003, (236K) Pg.7.

  • Tourism: an economic driver. September 1997, (170K) Pg.1-2.

  • Tourism Impact Up. March 2000, (181K) Pg.3.

  • Urban Clusters. May 1999, (273K) Pg.3.

  • Urban Clusters II. June 1999, (311K) Pg.3.

  • Workforce Development. May 2000, (178K) Pg.3.

  • You Belong in Connecticut September 2000, (183K) Pg.3.

top
  • Is Connecticut Losing Jobs to Other States?  November 2017 (353K) Pg.1-5
    By Andy Condon Ph.D., Director of Research, Department of Labor, Andrew.Condon@ct.gov

    Rightly or wrongly, Connecticut's job growth performance is often talked about in the context of “winning” or “losing” to other parts of the country. This article uses the location quotient measure to begin to address this issue by using national Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) data to measure relative job growth from and to Connecticut over time. According to the US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics, location quotients are ratios that allow an area's distribution of employment by industry, ownership, and size class to be compared to a reference area's distribution. download article only ] 

  • Annual Unemployment Rate by Town, 2012-2016.  June 2017 (336K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    By looking at the unemployment rates, we can see that Connecticut has experienced six years of economic recovery. Unemployment rates come from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For a brief explanation of the methodology of LAUS, see "Labor Force Estimates" on page 23. In the June 2016 Digest, 2011-2015 annual average town unemployment rate estimates were published. This year, revised 2012-2016 data are analyzed. download article only ] 

  • Short-Term Employment Projections Through 2018.  May 2017 (355K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor and Patrick.Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor

    Each year, the Office of Research at the Connecticut Department of Labor produces short-term employment projections by industry and occupation. The projections are based on a careful analysis of the Connecticut economy and labor market.

    Current Situation
    March of 2010 was the first month of payroll job growth after the great recession. Seven years later the Connecticut economy has regained 91,200 jobs or 77% of the 119,100 lost during the "great recession" as of March 2017. Overall employment growth has been dampened by the government sector which is down 14,000 jobs since February 2010. Private sector employment has fared significantly better having recovered 94% of the jobs lost during the downturn. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities in 2015.  February 2017 (334K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    Connecticut lost 44 lives to work injuries in 2015. With an increase from 2014's revised count of 35, this is the biggest loss since 2010. It is also above Connecticut's annual average of 39 work-related deaths. Nationally, a total of 4,836 fatal workplace injuries occurred in 2015. This was a slight increase from 2014's reported 4,821 deaths. However, the rate of fatalities per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers fell from 3.43 in 2014 to 3.38 in 2015. [ download article only ] 

  • The Crossroads of Millennials and Migration.  December 2016 (411K) Pg.1-5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Connecticut Office of Policy and Management, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    The nation is closely watching the actions of millennials - what do millennials like, what are their work preferences, where do millennials want to live? And there is good reason for this attention - millennials now make up the largest living generation. According to the Pew Research Center, millennials, whom they define as born between 1981 and 1997, recently surpassed baby boomers in 2015 as the largest living generation. As a result the preferences of millennials do have a sizable impact on the economy - and their choices have substantially deviated from those of prior generations. But as millennials age their preferences likely will return to historical norms, which could benefit Connecticut. Long-run domestic migration patterns show Connecticut has historically imported adults in their late twenties and thirties (and forties when international migration is included). As millennials start settling down and moving into larger homes, safe communities, and for good schools, hopefully Connecticut will stand out as a top destination. [ download article only ] 

  • Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment Rates by Labor Market Area, 1990-July 2016.  October 2016 (404K) Pg.4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    In addition to not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate estimates, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) also produces monthly seasonally adjusted data by major labor market areas (LMAs) for Connecticut, going back to 1990. Because of the one-month lag, these estimates are not published in the Labor Situation or the Connecticut Economic Digest, but they are available upon request. This article looks at the long-term monthly trends of seasonally adjusted unemployment rates of all the LMAs. The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research separately produced seasonally adjusted estimates for small areas (Enfield, Torrington-Northwest, and Danielson-Northeast) so that all areas in the state can be compared and analyzed. Note that because of the recent geographical changes, these small non-BLS LMAs can be seasonally adjusted only back to 2010. download article only ] 

  • Long Term Industry and Occupational Projections: 2014-2024.  September 2016 (354K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, DOL, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov and Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, DOL, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    NATIONAL PROJECTIONS ~ Every two years, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics produces 10 year projections of the U.S. labor force and employment by industry and occupation. The latest projections are for the period 2014 to 2024.

    Labor Force ~ The U.S. labor force is projected to increase by 9.8 million workers from 2014 to 2024 (a 0.6% annualized growth rate) with the 2024 labor force projected to be older and more diverse. The number of workers aged 55 and older is expected to increase by more than 6.7 million (+19.8%) while the number aged 16 to 24 is projected to decrease by 2.8 million (-13.1%) with the largest labor force cohort – those aged 25 to 54 (also known as prime-age workers) up just 3.9 million (+3.9%). As a percent of the labor force, the 16-24 cohort will fall 2.1 percentage points to 14.1% in 2024; increased postsecondary enrollment is a primary cause of this share decrease. [ download article only ] 

  • Introducing the Job-to-Job Flows Data.  July 2016 (365K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    This article introduces a new set of statistics about the dynamic nature of the labor market – the Job-to-Job Flows. These statistics provide information on workers who leave or lose one job and take another with little or no unemployment in between. For example, when a worker quits one job to take a better job at a different company, this will be counted as a job-to-job flow. While the data is still considered "Beta" and will be enhanced and improved in future years, the recently released numbers help us understand job changes in Connecticut.  [ download article only ] 

  • Labor Force Participation Rate and Employment-Population Ratio, 1976-2016.  June 2016 (402K) Pg.1-2 & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    The Connecticut Economic Digest now publishes the monthly labor force participation rate and employment-population ratio, which are found under the "Unemployment" table on page 6. These two data, produced by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), provide additional perspectives to the unemployment rate data in assessing the current economic condition. This article also looks at their entire historical trends. download article only ] 

  • Annual Town Unemployment Rates, 2011-2015.  June 2016 (402K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    Unemployment rates come from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For a brief explanation of the methodology of LAUS, see "Labor Force Estimates" on page 23. In July 2015 Digest, 2010-2014 annual average town unemployment rate estimates were published. This year, revised 2011-2015 data are analyzed. download article only ] 

  • Economic Status of People with Disabilities.  February 2016 (321K) Pg.1-5
    By Al Sylvestre, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Alan.Sylvestre@ct.gov

    In the eight years since the recession that began in 2008, conditions in Connecticut's labor market continue to improve. As a segment of the working-age population age 16 years and older that constitutes 5% of the work force, among whom 44% are employed full time according to the US Census Bureau's most recent (2014) American Community Survey (ACS), people with disabilities are becoming increasingly visible in the labor market. What follows is a brief examination of this population's economic characteristics as well as some of the programs and services that provide access to opportunities for its members to attach to the labor force and retain employment in response to changes in disability status.. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities, 1992-2014.  December 2015 (433K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    Throughout our history, the American worker has labored not only to erect buildings and cities, but also to raise the standards of our Nation's workplaces. Through protests and picket lines, by organizing and raising their voices together, workers have won small and large victories that have pushed our country closer to ensuring safer and healthier jobs for all.

    Across the United States, as dedicated Americans clock in at factories, walk onto construction sites, put on their hospital uniforms, and report to do the daily work that drives our Nation's progress, they give meaning to the simple yet profound belief that if you work hard and take responsibility, you can get ahead. However, each year millions of people have their shifts cut short by work-related injuries and illnesses, and on average, 12 Americans lose their lives on the job every day." - President Barack Obama

    In 2014, America lost 4,679 people to work-related deaths. Thirty-three of those deaths were in Connecticut. Connecticut's "low" number is primarily due to low employment in high-risk industries. However, it cannot be stressed enough that what is statistically unremarkable has a devastating impact on loved ones. One work-related death is one too many. [ download article only ] 

  • Construction Occupational Employment Trend, 2005-2013. August 2015 (345K) Pg.4.
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The bursting of the housing bubble hit certain areas of the economy harder than others. Though Connecticut was not an epicenter of the housing bubble and bust, its impact can be seen when examining construction occupational employment. This article uses data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS) as it provides estimates of labor market variables not captured in other datasets, including unemployment by occupation and prior occupation of those not in the labor force. From this we can get a generalized idea of how construction occupations in Connecticut have fared during the recession and recovery.[ download article only ] 

  • Annual Town Unemployment Rates, 2010-2014.  July 2015 (338K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Unemployment rate data are from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Recently LAUS underwent a major revision back to 2010. download article only ] 

  • Examining Education, Incomes, and the "Skills Gap".  June 2015 (280K) Pg.1-3, 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    While the unemployment rate has dropped sharply over the past few years, it remains higher than it was before the "great recession" began. On the other hand, the number and rate of job openings are higher than their prerecession levels. In March, there were five million job openings nationally despite an unemployment rate of 5.4%, a percentage point higher than prevailed in 2006 and 2007. Despite the pool of unemployed job-seekers, some business groups report that their members are having difficulty hiring employees with the skills and experience they are seeking. This has led some to conclude that there is a gap between the skills available in the labor force and the needs of employers. [ download article only ] 

  • A Review of 2004-2014 Employment Projections.  June 2015 (280K) Pg.4
    By Michael Fitzgerald, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Michael.Fitzgerald@ct.gov

    It will be years—not in my time—before a woman will become Prime Minister." That's a quote made by Margaret Thatcher in 1969, ten years before she took over as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in 1979. In other words, projections—especially 10 years ahead of time—are difficult. Every two years, the Office of Research at the Connecticut Department of Labor creates 10-year employment projections for the state. Now that employment statistics for 2014 have been released, we are going to take a look at the 2004-2014 projections and see how well the projections fared. Statewide numbers for the Major Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) groupings and Occupation Employment Statistics data from 2014 will be what is focused on. There are a couple of things to bear in mind when looking at the original projections. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities, 1992-2013.  December 2014 (433K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    "No one should have to sacrifice their life for their livelihood, because a nation built on the dignity of work must provide safe working conditions for its people." –Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez In 2013, work injuries claimed the lives of 4,405 workers in America. Twenty-six of those deaths occurred in Connecticut.

    Since 1992, the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics has conducted the annual Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) to document workplace fatalities. Connecticut averages 39 workrelated fatalities annually with a high of 57 in 1998. In 2013, Connecticut saw the lowest recorded number of 26 lost workers. This "low" number is not statistically notable and cannot be attributed to a specific cause. However, it cannot be stressed enough that what is statistically unremarkable has a devastating impact on loved ones. One workrelated death is one too many. As Dr. David Michaels, the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, states, "Making a living shouldn't have to cost you your life. Workplace fatalities, injuries, and illnesses are preventable. Safe jobs happen because employers make the choice to fulfill their responsibilities and protect their workers." [ download article only ] 

  • Long Term Industry and Occupational Projections: 2012-2022.  September 2014 (410K) Pg.1-5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Every two years the Connecticut Department of Labor produces and publishes ten year projections by industry and occupation. This year's projections cover the period 2012-2022, which invites a comparison to the previous ten year period. The 2002-2012 period spans the global financial and economic crisis that caused the worst national recession since the Great Depression. While employment started to increase after the first quarter of 2010, by 2012 employment in many industries was still below 2002 levels. Importantly, the industries that grew the most after the recovery started were not necessarily the same as those that lost the most during the recession, so the industry and occupational mix of the economy has changed. The long term projections help put these changes into perspective and peek over the horizon to see what the industry and occupational profile of the economy would look like if full employment could be achieved within the next decade. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Migration Patterns.  August 2013 (418K) 4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Examining interstate migration patterns provides an interesting view of where new Nutmeggers are coming from and where former Connecticut residents are going. Table 1 shows the ten largest sources of Connecticut inflow migration. The bordering states of New York and Massachusetts had the largest combined share of total inflow to the state at 39 percent of total inflows. Together with the third largest inflow state of Florida, those three states totaled 45 percent of flows into Connecticut. These three states since 2005 have consistently comprised the top three inflow origins to Connecticut. Overall inflow to the state in 2011 was 73,607 new residents. From 2005 through 2011 inflow peaked in 2006 at 88,518 new residents. [ download article only ]  

  • Job Polarization in Connecticut.  December 2012 (185K) Pg.1,2 & 5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, DOL, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    In recent months, much has been written of the hollowing out of the middle class during the recovery. A New York Times article partially attributes this to longterm trends of automation and globalization that cause a polarization of labor to high and low wage employment. The same article extensively reports on the findings by The National Employment Law Project (NELP). Their work analyzed nationwide Current Population Survey (CPS) data and found middle wage jobs incurred a majority of job losses during the recession, while lowwage jobs experienced a majority of post-recession job growth. The report also found the share of high wage job losses and subsequent gains to be 19 and 20 percent. [ download article only ]  

  • Youth Employment Patterns Revisited. September 2012  (198K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Last summer, the Connecticut Economic Digest published an article on youth employment in Connecticut. It used wage and Department of Motor Vehicles records to illustrate employment change by industry from the second to third quarter of 2007 and 2010. The article noted that youth employment declined at nearly three times the rate of overall Connecticut employment. This summer, the Census Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWI) dataset has been examined to provide a more detailed and longer-term analysis of labor market changes for youths in Connecticut. The analysis provides more detail as to how the recession has affected the state's youngest segment of the labor force and analyzes long-term trends that help indicate the direction we are heading a full 3 years into the NBER-declared recovery. [ download article only ]  

  • Young People Aren't Fleeing and the Cities Aren't Dying. October 2011  (419K) Pg.1-3, 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, DOL, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Data from the U.S. Census Bureau refute the conventional wisdom that young people are leaving Connecticut in droves and the population of our cities is in decline. One example of popular perceptions comes from the "2011 Survey of Connecticut Business" released in early September by BlumShapiro and CBIA which reported "An overwhelming majority of respondents (85%) worry about the state's slow population growth and out-migration of 21-to-45 year-olds." Similarly, when population estimates from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS) were released, a press release was headlined "Connecticut Still at Bottom in Attracting, Keeping 25-34-Year-Olds." In fact, the 2010 U.S. Census confirms that Ct's population is aging, but that the situation is not as dire or dramatic as perceptions would suggest. [ download article only ]  

  • Youth Employment in Connecticut. July 2011  (419K) Pg.3
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    For many, summer is a time for relaxation. The season is typified by sunny weather, family vacations, barbeques and trips to the beach. However, the season also represents a young workers initiation into the labor force. Be it work as a camp counselor, lifeguard, salesperson or waitress, those summer jobs teach youths valuable skills they will carry with them onto enhanced employment opportunities later in life. Unfortunately, for a growing number of American youths, these jobs are increasingly hard to find. [ download article only ]  

  • Measures of Labor Underutilization. February 2010 (401K) Pg.3.
    By Salvatore DiPillo, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Salvatore.DiPillo@ct.gov

    In the November 2009 issue of the Digest we began publishing for Connecticut, in addition to the official unemployment rate, the most comprehensive measure of labor underutilization. Referred to as the "U-6" by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) which sets the definition of the labor force, employment and unemployment and the methodologies for measuring these, it is just one of six measures of unemployment for the nation and the states. [ download article only ] 

  • Expanded Current Population Survey and Its Effect on Labor Force Data Estimates. August 2001, (211K) Pg.4.

  • Improvements Coming to Labor Force Estimates. December 2004, (826K) Pg.2-5.

  • Introducing an Alternative Measure of Labor Underutilization in Connecticut. November 2009 (402K) Pg.5.

  • Norwich area has greatest labor force growth. October 2004, (335K) Pg.1,5.

  • Stamford tops in labor force and establishments. February 2006, (611K) Pg.1-3.

top
  • State Economic Indexes (SEI), 2010-2016.  October 2017 (375K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, and Dana Placzek, Office of Research Department of Labor

    Connecticut ranked 32nd out of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) in the State Economic Indexes (SEI) in 2016, moving up from the 39th position in 2015. In fact, last year's overall economic performance was the best in terms of the ranking in six years. Colorado, once again, ranked first in the nation with the highest index last year (145.3), while Wyoming came in last (102.6). Our state's index of 120.5 was below the nationwide value of 124.5.

    SEI: Methodology
    Applying the same components and methodology of the Connecticut Town Economic Indexes (See September 2017 issue), the Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research also developed the State Economic Indexes, an annual composite index of each of the 50 states and DC. With recently available annual average data from the Quarterly Census Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, along with the revised annual average unemployment rate from Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS), annual SEI is reestimated for the 2010-2016 period.

    These indexes provide a measure of the overall economic strength of each state that can be compared and ranked. Four annual average state economic indicators were used as components: 1. the number of the total covered business establishments, 2. total covered employment, 3. real covered wages, and 4. the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI): 2013-2016.  September 2017 (375K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, and Dana Placzek, Office of Research Department of Labor

    The Connecticut Town Economic Index showed the state's cities and towns experienced further economic improvement in 2016, though at a slower pace than in 2015.

    CTEI: Methodology: The CTEI was introduced two years ago and is being released annually. The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in the state. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, inflation-adjusted covered wages, and the unemployment rate.

    Establishments are the physical work units located in the municipality. Employment is the number of employees on payroll in the establishments that are located in the town. Wages are the aggregate payroll pay divided by the total average employment. These three measures come from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program and include all those who are covered under the unemployment insurance law, thus capturing nearly 100 percent of all the employees in each town. download article only ] 

  • Anchor Institutions and the Innovation Economy.  June 2017 (336K) Pg.1,2,5
    By Al Sylvestre, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Alan.Sylvestre@ct.gov

    Anchor Institution Characteristics
    Hospitals and institutions of higher learning deploying their considerable resources to promote neighborhood revitalization through economic development are known as anchor institutions. Often acting in concert with nonprofit and public agencies, anchor institutions create opportunities for home ownership among low- and moderate-income households as well as supporting educational and apprenticeship programs for disadvantaged youth to prepare them for gainful employment.

    This article offers a brief look at two prominent Connecticut anchor institutions and others throughout the country as examples of how institutional self-interest and philanthropy have successfully combined to drive the revitalization of the communities that host these institutions. If these institutions continue to be nourished by capital, innovation, and the commitment of community and social resource providers, the possibility remains that impoverished communities can flourish through the perseverance of individuals and institutions that see potential in their neighborhoods. download article only ] 

  • Short-Term Employment Projections Through 2018.  May 2017 (355K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor and Patrick.Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor

    Each year, the Office of Research at the Connecticut Department of Labor produces short-term employment projections by industry and occupation. The projections are based on a careful analysis of the Connecticut economy and labor market.

    Current Situation
    March of 2010 was the first month of payroll job growth after the great recession. Seven years later the Connecticut economy has regained 91,200 jobs or 77% of the 119,100 lost during the "great recession" as of March 2017. Overall employment growth has been dampened by the government sector which is down 14,000 jobs since February 2010. Private sector employment has fared significantly better having recovered 94% of the jobs lost during the downturn. [ download article only ] 

  • The Crossroads of Millennials and Migration.  December 2016 (411K) Pg.1-5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Connecticut Office of Policy and Management, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    The nation is closely watching the actions of millennials - what do millennials like, what are their work preferences, where do millennials want to live? And there is good reason for this attention - millennials now make up the largest living generation. According to the Pew Research Center, millennials, whom they define as born between 1981 and 1997, recently surpassed baby boomers in 2015 as the largest living generation. As a result the preferences of millennials do have a sizable impact on the economy - and their choices have substantially deviated from those of prior generations. But as millennials age their preferences likely will return to historical norms, which could benefit Connecticut. Long-run domestic migration patterns show Connecticut has historically imported adults in their late twenties and thirties (and forties when international migration is included). As millennials start settling down and moving into larger homes, safe communities, and for good schools, hopefully Connecticut will stand out as a top destination. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI): 2010-2015.  October 2016 (404K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI) showed the state's cities and towns experienced further economic improvement in 2015. The CTEI was introduced last year and will be released annually in the October issue. The revised 2011 index values for all 169 cities and towns in the state are available upon request.

    CTEI: Methodology: The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in Connecticut. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, real covered wages, and the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Introducing the State Economic Indexes (SEI).  November 2016 (319K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    If the 50 states and the District of Columbia, Connecticut ranked 38th in the State Economic Indexes (SEI) in 2015. Our state's index of 118.9 was below the nationwide value of 124.1 (see table on page 2). Over the last five years, Connecticut's overall index performed the worst in 2013, ranking 45th. However, last year was the best since 2011, bringing up the state to 38th position. As the chart on page 3 shows, Colorado ranked first in the nation with the highest index last year (137.9), while New Mexico came in last (107.2). download article only ] 

  • Business Formation in Connecticut: 2000-2015.  August 2016 (328K) Pg.4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Secretary of the State's office maintains records of all business entities in the state. From these records, an aggregation of business type and location has produced interesting data on business formation change in Connecticut over time. This information is available publicly from 1980 to 2015 by business entity type and geographically down to town levels. This article examines business formation change from 2000-2015 and shows how recent cyclical factors have impacted business development in the state. [ download article only ]  

  • Introducing the Job-to-Job Flows Data.  July 2016 (365K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    This article introduces a new set of statistics about the dynamic nature of the labor market – the Job-to-Job Flows. These statistics provide information on workers who leave or lose one job and take another with little or no unemployment in between. For example, when a worker quits one job to take a better job at a different company, this will be counted as a job-to-job flow. While the data is still considered "Beta" and will be enhanced and improved in future years, the recently released numbers help us understand job changes in Connecticut.  [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Short-Term Employment Outlook to 2017.  May 2016 (347K) Pg.1-5
    By Sarah Pilipaitis, Economist, Department of Labor

    Connecticut is now into its sixth year of recovery from the recession that took its toll on the state from 2008 to 2010. Over the recession, Connecticut lost over 5% of its nonfarm employment, roughly 91,100 jobs based on annual averages. The annual average nonfarm employment reached its peak in 2008 at 1,699,100 jobs. By the time it reached the trough in 2010, the state's employment had fallen to 1,608,000 jobs. The largest losses came from the construction, manufacturing, trade, transportation and utilities, and the professional and business services sectors. Those four sectors alone accounted for 80% of the lost jobs. The lone sector that was able to create jobs during the recession was education and health services, expanding by about 10,000 jobs from the peak to trough years. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's so-called Misery Index Falling as of Late.  November 2015 (234K) Pg.1-3
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, DOL Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov

    A straight forward Misery Index was developed in the 1960's by Yale economist Arthur Okun, who is primarily known for formulating Okun's Law – a perceived inverse relationship between a country's unemployment rate and its national output – gross domestic product (GDP). As a nation's unemployment rate declined, Okun's Law inferred that a country's gross product/output increased with some degree of regularity, and/or vice versa. This fundamental supposition of Okun's Law has held up pretty well over time. Okun's Misery Index, aptly an economic indicator that similarly is utilizing the unemployment rate (seasonally adjusted), is essentially the unemployment rate added to the annualized inflation rate (UR+CPI U annualized). These are two statistics our federal/state cooperating partner, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, produces on a monthly basis. The Office of Research shares in the development of the state's unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Introducing the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI).  October 2015 (350K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in Connecticut. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, real covered wages, and the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Job Vacancy Survey.  September 2015 (371K) Pg.1-5
    By Andy Condon Ph.D., Director of Research, Department of Labor, Andrew.Condon@ct.gov

    In 2014, the Connecticut Department of Labor’s Office of Research, in partnership with the Office of Workforce Competitiveness, conducted a survey of Connecticut employers designed to estimate hiring demand and job vacancy characteristics by industry and occupation.

    Survey Sample - Information was gathered through the survey of a stratified sample of 10,300 firms in five Labor Market Areas. Firms excluded from the sampling process include Government entities and businesses with no employees. The sample was stratified by industry “supersector,” Labor Market Area and firm employment size. [ download article only ]  

  • Construction Occupational Employment Trend, 2005-2013. August 2015 (345K) Pg.4.
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The bursting of the housing bubble hit certain areas of the economy harder than others. Though Connecticut was not an epicenter of the housing bubble and bust, its impact can be seen when examining construction occupational employment. This article uses data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS) as it provides estimates of labor market variables not captured in other datasets, including unemployment by occupation and prior occupation of those not in the labor force. From this we can get a generalized idea of how construction occupations in Connecticut have fared during the recession and recovery.[ download article only ] 

  • The Economic Impact of Tourism in Connecticut. May 2015 (367K) Pg.1-5
    Tourism Economics - Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development

    Tourism is an important economic engine in Connecticut, and all business sectors in the state economy benefit from tourism activity directly and/or indirectly. Visitors to Connecticut represent a significant economic benefit as they spend money in the local economy on items such as lodging, food and beverage, retail purchases, and recreation. Visitor spending has an even larger impact as it ripples through the statewide economy, generating revenues and jobs for businesses spanning a wide range of industries. Since the recession, Connecticut's tourism industry has created 5,000 new jobs. Visitors to Connecticut spent $8.3 billion in 2013, generating a total economic impact of $14.0 billion, supporting nearly 119,000 total jobs.[ download article only ] 

  • Danbury Labor Market Area Profiled. February 2011 (402K) Pg.1-3 & 5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    A labor market area is defined as an economically integrated geographic area within which individuals can reside and find employment within a reasonable distance or can readily change employment without changing their place of residence. Connecticut has nine labor market areas, named for the major cities that serve as their hubs. The areas are Bridgeport-Stamford, Danbury, Enfield, Hartford, New Haven, Norwich-New London, Torrington, Waterbury and Willimantic-Danielson.[ download article only ] 

  • The Geography of Connecticut Labor Market Dynamics. December 2010 (550K) Pg.1-3
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    The labor market is dynamic. Even during the worst months of the recession, when nationally jobs on net were declining by approximately 800,000 per month, there were still approximately four million new hires. Of course, there were even more separations, which is why total employment declined on net – but the number of separations was actually lower during the recession than during the previous period of job growth. In times of strong growth, approximately five million workers lose or leave their jobs every month. [ download article only ] 

  • Changes in Labor Market Areas. December 2004, (826K) Pg.2-5.

  • Connecticut’s Labor Market Dynamics: Clues From KLEMS? December 2009 (419K) Pg.1-3, 5.

  • Connecticut's Gold Coast (Stamford LMA) is shining. March 1998, (231K) Pg.2-3.

  • Danbury Labor Market Area thriving. August 1997, (180K) Pg.1-3.

  • Danielson Area: On A Fast Recovery Track. November 1998, (287K) Pg.2.

  • Hartford Area employment-signs of growth? September 1997, (170K) Pg.3-4.

  • Job outlook improving for New Haven Area. June 1997, (177K) Pg.4.

  • Major Northeast Gaming Labor Markets Reviewed May 2009, (403K) Pg.2.

  • Reconstructing Bridgeport. July 1998, (397K) Pg.1-4.

  • Southeastern Connecticut economic secrets revealed. May 1997, (328K) Pg.1-4.

  • Torrington Area: A diamond in the rough, The. September 1998, (272K) Pg.1-2.

  • Transformation of the Waterbury Area, The. November 1997, (227K) Pg.1-2, 4.

top

Ask the Digest
  • What is the difference between "nonfarm employment" and the "employed"? July 2001, (215K) Pg.5.

  • What are Business Cycles? September 2001, (233K) Pg.5.

  • Making Sense of Census July 2002, (239K) Pg.1-3.

Consumer Price Index (CPI)

  • 1998 CPI Revision, The. May 1998, (257K) Pg.2.

  • A brief look at the Consumer Price Index. December 1996, (287K) Pg.4.

Defense Spending

  • Connecticut's Defense-Related Industry: Spending, Employment, and Dependency  September 2011  (421K) Pg.1-3, 5.
    By Mark Prisloe, Associate Economist, DECD, Mark.Prisloe@ct.gov

    This article examines how Connecticut's defense industry has fared in recent years and how much the overall state economy depends on it. When last reported in this publication (August 1996 and February 2005), from 1985 to 1995 U.S. federal defense procurement had dropped precipitously by 43% from $179 billion in 1985 to $101 billion in 1995. It was $327.5 billion in federal fiscal year (FFY) 2009. This was in part attributable to the "peace dividend" following the end of the Cold War. In Connecticut defense procurement also dropped significantly over the same period by 64%, from $7.1 billion to $2.5 billion (in fixed 1992 dollars). This trend has been thoroughly reversed by one of the largest surges in national security spending in the state's history. [ download article only ] 

  • Defense spending down. August 1996, (323K) Pg.1-3.

Education and Training

  • Does Education Matter? May 2013  (419K) Pg.1,2 & 5.
    By Sarah York, Economist, Department of Labor

    With the varied reports on the state of the economy recently, many people are finding it difficult to tell which direction the economy is headed. The uncertainty leads many questioning their perceived notion on how to become successful in a chosen career. With increased attention on the costs of higher education coupled with the meek jobs reports, the decision to attend college may not seem worth it. However, an analysis of the most recent data available for Connecticut suggests that there is still a significant benefit to pursue higher education. [ read more ]  

  • Even in Tough Times, Education Improves Chances in Labor Market. July 2012  (419K) Pg.3-4.
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    During graduation season, there were a number of stories in the news about the difficulty that many new college graduates are having finding employment, particularly high paying employment within a field related to their course of study. In addition, announcements by many institutions of tuition and fee increases and the debates in Washington about the interest rate changed on student loans generated media attention on the high cost of higher education. Implicit in some of this coverage is the idea that given the high cost of going to college, and the shortterm difficulty of some college graduates in the labor market, a college education might not be "worth it." While "individual results may vary" as they say (in fact they do vary significantly), on average additional education is still associated with increased employment and higher long term earnings prospects. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut's School-to-Career System. November 1999, (194K) Pg.4.

  • Educating Connecticut. November 2008, (415K) Pg.1-3.

  • High school graduates profiled. February 1997, (303K) Pg.1-2, 4.

  • Occupational Information System (OIS). January 1997, (315K) Pg.4.

Economic Indicators

  • State Economic Indexes (SEI), 2010-2016.  October 2017 (375K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, and Dana Placzek, Office of Research Department of Labor

    Connecticut ranked 32nd out of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) in the State Economic Indexes (SEI) in 2016, moving up from the 39th position in 2015. In fact, last year's overall economic performance was the best in terms of the ranking in six years. Colorado, once again, ranked first in the nation with the highest index last year (145.3), while Wyoming came in last (102.6). Our state's index of 120.5 was below the nationwide value of 124.5.

    SEI: Methodology
    Applying the same components and methodology of the Connecticut Town Economic Indexes (See September 2017 issue), the Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research also developed the State Economic Indexes, an annual composite index of each of the 50 states and DC. With recently available annual average data from the Quarterly Census Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, along with the revised annual average unemployment rate from Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS), annual SEI is reestimated for the 2010-2016 period.

    These indexes provide a measure of the overall economic strength of each state that can be compared and ranked. Four annual average state economic indicators were used as components: 1. the number of the total covered business establishments, 2. total covered employment, 3. real covered wages, and 4. the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI): 2013-2016.  September 2017 (375K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, and Dana Placzek, Office of Research Department of Labor

    The Connecticut Town Economic Index showed the state's cities and towns experienced further economic improvement in 2016, though at a slower pace than in 2015.

    CTEI: Methodology: The CTEI was introduced two years ago and is being released annually. The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in the state. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, inflation-adjusted covered wages, and the unemployment rate.

    Establishments are the physical work units located in the municipality. Employment is the number of employees on payroll in the establishments that are located in the town. Wages are the aggregate payroll pay divided by the total average employment. These three measures come from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program and include all those who are covered under the unemployment insurance law, thus capturing nearly 100 percent of all the employees in each town. download article only ] 

  • Introducing the State Economic Indexes (SEI).  November 2016 (319K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    If the 50 states and the District of Columbia, Connecticut ranked 38th in the State Economic Indexes (SEI) in 2015. Our state's index of 118.9 was below the nationwide value of 124.1 (see table on page 2). Over the last five years, Connecticut's overall index performed the worst in 2013, ranking 45th. However, last year was the best since 2011, bringing up the state to 38th position. As the chart on page 3 shows, Colorado ranked first in the nation with the highest index last year (137.9), while New Mexico came in last (107.2). download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI): 2010-2015.  October 2016 (404K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI) showed the state's cities and towns experienced further economic improvement in 2015. The CTEI was introduced last year and will be released annually in the October issue. The revised 2011 index values for all 169 cities and towns in the state are available upon request.

    CTEI: Methodology: The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in Connecticut. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, real covered wages, and the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Business Formation in Connecticut: 2000-2015.  August 2016 (328K) Pg.4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Secretary of the State's office maintains records of all business entities in the state. From these records, an aggregation of business type and location has produced interesting data on business formation change in Connecticut over time. This information is available publicly from 1980 to 2015 by business entity type and geographically down to town levels. This article examines business formation change from 2000-2015 and shows how recent cyclical factors have impacted business development in the state. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut's so-called Misery Index Falling as of Late.  November 2015 (234K) Pg.1-3
    By Lincoln S. Dyer, Economist, DOL Lincoln.Dyer@ct.gov

    A straight forward Misery Index was developed in the 1960's by Yale economist Arthur Okun, who is primarily known for formulating Okun's Law – a perceived inverse relationship between a country's unemployment rate and its national output – gross domestic product (GDP). As a nation's unemployment rate declined, Okun's Law inferred that a country's gross product/output increased with some degree of regularity, and/or vice versa. This fundamental supposition of Okun's Law has held up pretty well over time. Okun's Misery Index, aptly an economic indicator that similarly is utilizing the unemployment rate (seasonally adjusted), is essentially the unemployment rate added to the annualized inflation rate (UR+CPI U annualized). These are two statistics our federal/state cooperating partner, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, produces on a monthly basis. The Office of Research shares in the development of the state's unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Introducing the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI).  October 2015 (350K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in Connecticut. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, real covered wages, and the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • A Look at Phil Fed's Coincident and Leading Indexes.  April 2013 (423K) Pg.4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    State Coincident Indexes. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia produces a monthly coincident index for each of the 50 states and the nation, and it combines four state-level indicators, nonfarm payroll employment, average hours worked in manufacturing, the unemployment rate, and wage and salary disbursements deflated by the consumer price index (U.S. city average) to summarize current economic conditions in a single statistic. The trend for each state's index is set to the trend of its gross domestic product (GDP), so longterm growth in the state's index matches long-term growth in its GDP. download article only ] 

  • Coincident and Leading Employment Indexes Recalibrated for the New Millenium. March 2001, (226K) Pg.6-7.

  • Introducing the Connecticut Manufacturing Production Index. June 1999, (311K) Pg.1-2.

  • New auto registrations: what's really under the hood? February 1998, (238K) Pg.3-4.

  • Unmasking the Unemployment Rate. February 2003, (254K) Pg.1,3.

Employment Cost Index (ECI)

  • A look at the Employment Cost Index. October 1996, (305K) Pg.4.

Green Jobs

  • It's Not Easy Defining Green (with apologies to Kermit the Frog). September 2010 (408K) Pg.1-3,& 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Concern about the environment, unstable world energy markets, a desire to find new and creative ways to grow the economy, and significant public investment have kept interest high in the definition of "green jobs." Approximately $60 billion of the $787 billion stimulus package passed by Congress in 2009 was devoted to green activities. Data available on the Governor's website show over $200 million in grants to state agencies and another $200 million in tax credits and grants to other entities in Connecticut in the areas of energy and the environment from the stimulus legislation. [ download article only ] 

  • How "Green" is Connecticut's Economy? December 2008, (415K) Pg.1-3,5.

Labor Surplus Areas

  • Labor surplus areas offer advantages to businesses. December 1997, (249K) Pg.4.

Job Fairs

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)

  • NAICS - A New Look at Connecticut Industry. January 2000, (176K) Pg.3-4.

  • NAICS Implementation is Underway. February 2002, (207K) Pg.5.

  • Nonfarm Employment Data under NAICS. December 2002, (238K) Pg.1-2.

  • North American Industry Classification System. November 1996, (300K) Pg.4.

Seasonal Adjustment

  • Economic data: to adjust or not to adjust? November 1996, (300K) Pg.1-3.

Small Business

  • Is Connecticut a Small Business State? May 2012  (329K) Pg.1-5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Economist, Department of Labor, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    A widely held belief is small businesses create most of the new jobs. Given the recent recession and slow recovery, there is a lot of interest in job creation and policies to promote economic growth. Using a newly available data set from the U.S. Census, this article explores the notion of job creation by both firm age and firm size, and seeks to provide some clarity on the underlying dynamics of Connecticut's labor market.

    The Business Dynamics Statistics (BDS) produced by the U.S. Census Bureau is compiled using the Census Bureau's Business Register. The Business Register covers establishments of all domestic businesses including the self-employed, but excluding private households and governments. The BDS dataset tabulates data at the establishment level (an establishment is a fixed physical location where economic activity takes place). Establishments all belong to firms (a firm may be the parent of one establishment or multiple establishments). When analyzing BDS data for Connecticut it is important to note that though the establishments are all based within Connecticut, parent firms for Connecticut's establishments can be located anywhere in the nation. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut Nonemployer Businesses Exceed Quarter Million. September 2007, (634K) Pg.3.

  • Small Business Advisory Council continues activities. August 1997, (180K) Pg.4.

top
  • Occupational Profile: Diagnostic Medical Sonographer April 2016 (404K) Pg.4
    By Lisa D'Acunto, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Lisa.D'Acunto@ct.gov

    Diagnostic medical sonographers operate special imaging equipment to create images or conduct tests that help physicians assess and diagnose medical conditions. They specialize in creating images of the body's organs and tissues known as sonograms or ultrasounds. High frequency sound waves are used by a diagnostic sonographer to produce images of the inside of the body. An instrument called an ultrasound transducer is used on the parts of the patient's body that are being examined. Pulses of sound are emitted from the transducer that bounce back and cause echoes. Those echoes are then sent to the ultrasound machine, which processes them and displays them as images used by physicians for diagnosis. [ download article only ] 

  • Occupational Profile: Information Security Analysts.  October 2015 (350K) Pg.4
    By Sarah Pilipaitis, Economist, Department of Labor

    nformation security analysts plan, implement, upgrade, or monitor security measures for the protection of computer networks and information. They may ensure appropriate security controls are in place that will safeguard digital files and vital electronic infrastructure. Additionally, information security analysts may respond to computer security breaches and viruses. [ download article only ] 

  • A Closer Look at Home Care Occupations.  October 2014 (464K) Pg.1-5
    By Sarah Pilipaitis, Economist, Department of Labor

    Every two years, the Connecticut Department of Labor produces long-term occupational projections. The 2012-2022 projections show that two of the fastest growing occupations in terms of percent and net change come from the Home Health Care industry. The fastest growing occupation in Connecticut in the ten-year timeframe by net change is projected to be Personal Care Aides with a growth of 38.1 percent and 8,846 jobs. Nearby on the list of fastest growing occupations in Connecticut is Home Health Aides with a projected growth rate of 38.1% and 3,195 jobs from 2012 to 2022.1 The rise in these two occupations warrants a closer look at what each of them entails. [ download article only ] 

  • Occupational Profile: Mechanical Engineers August 2014 (414K) Pg.4
    By Michael Fitzgerald, Research Analyst, Department of Labor

    Mechanical Engineers work in a variety of industries developing, building and testing mechanical and thermal devices, including tools, engines and other machines. Mechanical Engineers typically work in an office environment but occasionally travel into the field to inspect or fix equipment. They need at least a bachelor's degree and a graduate degree may be required for management. Mechanical Engineers must be licensed if they sell their services publicly. (Occupational Outlook Handbook) [ download article only ] 

  • Occupational Profile: Dentist Hygienists April 2014 (404K) Pg.4
    By Lisa D'Acunto, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Lisa.D'Acunto@ct.gov

    Dental hygienists clean teeth, examine patients for signs of oral diseases such as gingivitis, take x-rays, and provide other preventative dental care. They remove tartar and plaque and apply sealants and fluorides to help protect teeth. Educating patients on ways to improve and maintain good oral health is also an important part of this profession. Dental hygienists typically need an associate's degree in dental hygiene. Bachelor's degrees in dental hygiene are also available, but are less common. A bachelor's or master's degree is usually required for research, teaching, or clinical practice in public or school health programs. Every state requires dental hygienists to be licensed; requirements vary by state. Licensure requirements in most states include a degree from an accredited dental hygiene program and passing grades on written and practical examinations. [ download article only ] 

  • Occupational Profile: Personal Financial Advisors. February 2014 (335K) Pg.4
    By Linda Mothersele, Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Linda.Mothersele@ct.gov

    Personal financial advisors give financial advice to people. They help with investments, taxes, and insurance decisions. A bachelor's degree is required for an entry level position, but a master's degree and certification increases chances for advancement and a higher level of pay. While most financial advisors work out of an office, nearly 25 percent of personal financial advisors were self employed in 2010. Their schedules often involve evening or weekend meetings with clients. They may also attend conferences and conduct classes in financial planning. With a high percentage of baby boomers nearing retirement there is a strong demand for this type of service. People are having to take more responsibility for their own financial planning as the funding for pensions has decreased, thus increasing the need for this type of service. [ download article only ] 

  • Occupational Profile: Physician Assistants. December 2013 (408K) Pg.4
    By Michael Polzella, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Michael.Polzella@ct.gov

    Physician assistants, also known as PAs, practice medicine under the direction of physicians and surgeons. They are formally trained to examine patients, diagnose injuries and illnesses, and provide treatment. According to the American Academy of Physician Assistants, the Physician Assistant (PA) profession was created to improve and expand healthcare. "In the mid-1960s, physicians and educators recognized there was a shortage of primary care physicians. To remedy this, Eugene A. Stead Jr., MD, of the Duke University Medical Center put together the first class of PAs in 1965. He selected Navy corpsmen who had received considerable medical training during their military service and based the curriculum on his knowledge of the fast-track training of doctors during World War II." [ download article only ] 

  • Pharmacist Employment Outlook Delivers a Dose of Brightness. October 2010 (408K) Pg.1-2
    By Sarah York, CCT Economist, Department of Labor, Sarah.York@ct.gov

    Pharmacists have long played an important role in the healthcare industry. While physicians diagnose a patient's ailments and prescribe medicine to treat it, pharmacists are responsible for distributing that medicine in a safe and accurate manner. As their careers evolve, pharmacists have been expanding their duties. With the increases in job responsibilities and the strong reliance the healthcare industry has on pharmacists, the job outlook remains strong. [ download article only ] 

  • Accountants and Auditors. December 2002, (238K) Pg.4.

  • Automotive Service Technicians And Mechanics. January 2006, (557K) Pg.1-3.

  • Carpenters January 2002, (226K) Pg.5.

  • Chefs and Head Cooks. October 2006, (652K) Pg.1-4.

  • Computer Engineers January 2001, (249K) Pg.5.

  • Computer Support Specialists. July 2003, (192K) Pg.4.

  • Construction managers October 2007, (574K) Pg.3.

  • Correctional Officers. October 2001, (238K) Pg.5.

  • Firefighters. April 2006, (495K) Pg.5.

  • Home Health Aides May 2002, (203K) Pg.6.

  • Librarians. September 2002, (268K) Pg.5.

  • Mechanical Engineers. February 2006, (611K) Pg.5.

  • Paralegals and Legal Assistants. November 2002, (238K) Pg.5.

  • Physical Therapists. February 2003, (254K) Pg.5.

  • Public Relations Specialists. December 2006, (512K) Pg.1-2.

  • Put Your Pet Passion To Work. July 2008, (415K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • Real estate brokers and sales agents. September 2006, (563K) Pg.1-4.

  • Recreation and Fitness Workers. January 2005, (661K) Pg.2-5.

  • Registered Nurses. June 2001, (375K) Pg.5.

  • Secondary School Teachers. December 2001, (238K) Pg.4.

  • Security Guards. January 2003, (248K) Pg.5.

  • Social and Human Service Assistants. March 2003, (266K) Pg.5.

  • Systems Analyst July 2002, (239K) Pg.4.

  • Veterinarians Jul 2009, (416K) Pg.1.

top
  • Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI): 2013-2016.  September 2017 (375K) Pg.1-5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, and Dana Placzek, Office of Research Department of Labor

    The Connecticut Town Economic Index showed the state's cities and towns experienced further economic improvement in 2016, though at a slower pace than in 2015.

    CTEI: Methodology: The CTEI was introduced two years ago and is being released annually. The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in the state. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, inflation-adjusted covered wages, and the unemployment rate.

    Establishments are the physical work units located in the municipality. Employment is the number of employees on payroll in the establishments that are located in the town. Wages are the aggregate payroll pay divided by the total average employment. These three measures come from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program and include all those who are covered under the unemployment insurance law, thus capturing nearly 100 percent of all the employees in each town. download article only ] 

  • Annual Unemployment Rate by Town, 2012-2016.  June 2017 (336K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    By looking at the unemployment rates, we can see that Connecticut has experienced six years of economic recovery. Unemployment rates come from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For a brief explanation of the methodology of LAUS, see "Labor Force Estimates" on page 23. In the June 2016 Digest, 2011-2015 annual average town unemployment rate estimates were published. This year, revised 2012-2016 data are analyzed. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI): 2010-2015.  October 2016 (404K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI) showed the state's cities and towns experienced further economic improvement in 2015. The CTEI was introduced last year and will be released annually in the October issue. The revised 2011 index values for all 169 cities and towns in the state are available upon request.

    CTEI: Methodology: The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in Connecticut. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, real covered wages, and the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Business Formation in Connecticut: 2000-2015.  August 2016 (328K) Pg.4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Secretary of the State's office maintains records of all business entities in the state. From these records, an aggregation of business type and location has produced interesting data on business formation change in Connecticut over time. This information is available publicly from 1980 to 2015 by business entity type and geographically down to town levels. This article examines business formation change from 2000-2015 and shows how recent cyclical factors have impacted business development in the state. [ download article only ]  

  • Annual Town Unemployment Rates, 2011-2015.  June 2016 (402K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    Unemployment rates come from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For a brief explanation of the methodology of LAUS, see "Labor Force Estimates" on page 23. In July 2015 Digest, 2010-2014 annual average town unemployment rate estimates were published. This year, revised 2011-2015 data are analyzed. download article only ] 

  • Introducing the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI).  October 2015 (350K) Pg.1-3, & 5
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research developed the Connecticut Town Economic Index (CTEI), an annual composite index of all 169 cities and towns in Connecticut. This index measures each town or city's overall economic health, which can be ranked and compared to others to gain perspective of its performance each year. Four annual average town economic indicators were used as components, which are total covered business establishments, total covered employment, real covered wages, and the unemployment rate. download article only ] 

  • Annual Town Unemployment Rates, 2010-2014.  July 2015 (338K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    Unemployment rate data are from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Recently LAUS underwent a major revision back to 2010. download article only ] 

  • A Profile of Mansfield, Connecticut. May 2013 (342K) Pg.3 & 4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Situated 23 miles from Hartford in the rolling countryside of eastern Connecticut, Mansfield has grown from a quaint farming community to become the home of a major university. The town was incorporated in 1702 by settlers from nearby Norwich and encompasses about 45 square miles. Early industries included agriculture and textile manufacturing. The town led the U.S. in silk production in the early 19th century. The 1881 formation of the Storrs Agricultural School that later became the University of Connecticut established education as a primary industry for the town. A majority of Mansfield's employment occurs in and around the UConn campus in the Storrs section of town and the recent Storrs Center commercial development seeks to further invigorate the local economy. [ download article only ]

  • West Hartford: One of the Ten Best Cities in the Country. October 2010 (408K) Pg.3 & 5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Incorporated on May 3rd 1854, West Hartford is a town of 63,908 and encompasses 22.4 square miles, situated exactly 98 miles from both Boston and New York City. Quiet suburban neighborhoods of early-mid twentieth century colonial style single-family homes typify much of the town. West Hartford Center, a thriving downtown commercial district, has in recent years become a popular location for commerce and recreation in central Connecticut. An extensive network of town parks, pools, theatre groups, golf courses and a skating rink helps to ensure the availability of year-round recreation and a high quality of life. [ download article only ] 

  • 2000 Population Increased for 139 Cities and Towns. May 2001, (378K) Pg.4-5.

  • A look at Connecticut's 169 cities and towns. May 1998, (257K) Pg.3-4.

  • A Tale of Large Cities: Population and Jobs. May 2000, (178K) Pg.1-3.

  • Barkhamsted. April 2007, (525K) Pg.3.

  • Branford: A Nice Place to Live, Work, and Play. September 2008, (425K) Pg.2.

  • Bristol October 2001, (238K) Pg.4.

  • Brooklyn May 2008, (421K) Pg.3.

  • Cities and Towns Profiled for 2005. October 2006, (652K) Pg.1-4.

  • Cities and Towns Profiled for 2007. September 2008, (425K) Pg.1.

  • Connecticut's Bustling Cities. June 2001, (375K) Pg.1-2.

  • Danbury. April 2001, (230K) Pg.5.

  • Farmington. April 2006, (495K) Pg.4.

  • Glastonbury. December 2006, (512K) Pg.3-5.

  • Greenwich Tops in Wages in 2001. September 2002, (268K) Pg.1,3.

  • Greenwich Tops in Wages Again. October 2003, (230K) Pg.5.

  • Hamden Profile November 2001, (237K) Pg.5.

  • Hartford: An Update. May 2000, (178K) Pg.4.

  • Hartford profile. June 2001, (375K) Pg.1-2.

  • Hartford Leads in Jobs, as Stamford Tops in Wages in 2000. July 2001, (215K) Pg.3.

  • Impact of small cities CDBG program awards, The. April 1998, (207K) Pg.2-3.

  • Marlborough. December 2002, (238K) Pg.3.

  • New Haven Leads in Jobs, as Greenwich Tops in Wages. July 1999, (192K) Pg.3-4.

  • New Haven Profile. January 2001, (249K) Pg.4.

  • Simsbury. February 2003, (254K) Pg.4.

  • South Windsor April 2002, (228K) Pg.4.

  • There's No Place Like Home…in Stamford February 2008, (955K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • Wallingford November 2002, (238K) Pg.4.

  • Westbrook April 2005, (962K) Pg.4.

  • Wethersfield January 2004, (222K) Pg.4.

  • Willington September 2001, (233K) Pg.4.

  • Windham July 2002, (239K) Pg.5.

top
  • Is Connecticut Losing Jobs to Other States?  November 2017 (353K) Pg.1-5
    By Andy Condon Ph.D., Director of Research, Department of Labor, Andrew.Condon@ct.gov

    Rightly or wrongly, Connecticut's job growth performance is often talked about in the context of “winning” or “losing” to other parts of the country. This article uses the location quotient measure to begin to address this issue by using national Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) data to measure relative job growth from and to Connecticut over time. According to the US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics, location quotients are ratios that allow an area's distribution of employment by industry, ownership, and size class to be compared to a reference area's distribution. download article only ] 

  • Robots in the Workplace: Threat or Asset?  July 2017 (337K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    The latest breakthroughs in robotics and artificial intelligence have awakened fears that technological advances will lead to a large decrease in the overall level of employment and widespread unemployment. While there will be disruptions, and many occupations are at high risk of computerization over the next decade or two, the dynamic labor market continues to create opportunities for workers with the right skills and education. .  [ download article only ] 

  • Annual Unemployment Rate by Town, 2012-2016.  June 2017 (336K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    By looking at the unemployment rates, we can see that Connecticut has experienced six years of economic recovery. Unemployment rates come from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For a brief explanation of the methodology of LAUS, see "Labor Force Estimates" on page 23. In the June 2016 Digest, 2011-2015 annual average town unemployment rate estimates were published. This year, revised 2012-2016 data are analyzed. download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities in 2015.  February 2017 (334K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    Connecticut lost 44 lives to work injuries in 2015. With an increase from 2014's revised count of 35, this is the biggest loss since 2010. It is also above Connecticut's annual average of 39 work-related deaths. Nationally, a total of 4,836 fatal workplace injuries occurred in 2015. This was a slight increase from 2014's reported 4,821 deaths. However, the rate of fatalities per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers fell from 3.43 in 2014 to 3.38 in 2015. [ download article only ] 

  • The Crossroads of Millennials and Migration.  December 2016 (411K) Pg.1-5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Connecticut Office of Policy and Management, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    The nation is closely watching the actions of millennials - what do millennials like, what are their work preferences, where do millennials want to live? And there is good reason for this attention - millennials now make up the largest living generation. According to the Pew Research Center, millennials, whom they define as born between 1981 and 1997, recently surpassed baby boomers in 2015 as the largest living generation. As a result the preferences of millennials do have a sizable impact on the economy - and their choices have substantially deviated from those of prior generations. But as millennials age their preferences likely will return to historical norms, which could benefit Connecticut. Long-run domestic migration patterns show Connecticut has historically imported adults in their late twenties and thirties (and forties when international migration is included). As millennials start settling down and moving into larger homes, safe communities, and for good schools, hopefully Connecticut will stand out as a top destination. [ download article only ] 

  • Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment Rates by Labor Market Area, 1990-July 2016.  October 2016 (404K) Pg.4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo, Associate Research Analyst, DOL, Jungmin.Joo@ct.gov

    In addition to not seasonally adjusted unemployment rate estimates, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) also produces monthly seasonally adjusted data by major labor market areas (LMAs) for Connecticut, going back to 1990. Because of the one-month lag, these estimates are not published in the Labor Situation or the Connecticut Economic Digest, but they are available upon request. This article looks at the long-term monthly trends of seasonally adjusted unemployment rates of all the LMAs. The Connecticut Department of Labor's Office of Research separately produced seasonally adjusted estimates for small areas (Enfield, Torrington-Northwest, and Danielson-Northeast) so that all areas in the state can be compared and analyzed. Note that because of the recent geographical changes, these small non-BLS LMAs can be seasonally adjusted only back to 2010. download article only ] 

  • Introducing the Job-to-Job Flows Data.  July 2016 (365K) Pg.3-4
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    This article introduces a new set of statistics about the dynamic nature of the labor market – the Job-to-Job Flows. These statistics provide information on workers who leave or lose one job and take another with little or no unemployment in between. For example, when a worker quits one job to take a better job at a different company, this will be counted as a job-to-job flow. While the data is still considered "Beta" and will be enhanced and improved in future years, the recently released numbers help us understand job changes in Connecticut.  [ download article only ] 

  • Annual Town Unemployment Rates, 2011-2015.  June 2016 (402K) Pg.3-4
    By Jungmin Charles Joo Department of Labor

    Unemployment rates come from the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. There are total of 169 cities and towns in Connecticut for which labor force estimates are produced monthly by the Connecticut Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For a brief explanation of the methodology of LAUS, see "Labor Force Estimates" on page 23. In July 2015 Digest, 2010-2014 annual average town unemployment rate estimates were published. This year, revised 2011-2015 data are analyzed. download article only ] 

  • Economic Status of People with Disabilities.  February 2016 (321K) Pg.1-5
    By Al Sylvestre, Research Analyst, Department of Labor Alan.Sylvestre@ct.gov

    In the eight years since the recession that began in 2008, conditions in Connecticut's labor market continue to improve. As a segment of the working-age population age 16 years and older that constitutes 5% of the work force, among whom 44% are employed full time according to the US Census Bureau's most recent (2014) American Community Survey (ACS), people with disabilities are becoming increasingly visible in the labor market. What follows is a brief examination of this population's economic characteristics as well as some of the programs and services that provide access to opportunities for its members to attach to the labor force and retain employment in response to changes in disability status. [ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities, 1992-2014.  December 2015 (433K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    Throughout our history, the American worker has labored not only to erect buildings and cities, but also to raise the standards of our Nation's workplaces. Through protests and picket lines, by organizing and raising their voices together, workers have won small and large victories that have pushed our country closer to ensuring safer and healthier jobs for all.

    Across the United States, as dedicated Americans clock in at factories, walk onto construction sites, put on their hospital uniforms, and report to do the daily work that drives our Nation's progress, they give meaning to the simple yet profound belief that if you work hard and take responsibility, you can get ahead. However, each year millions of people have their shifts cut short by work-related injuries and illnesses, and on average, 12 Americans lose their lives on the job every day." - President Barack Obama

    In 2014, America lost 4,679 people to work-related deaths. Thirty-three of those deaths were in Connecticut. Connecticut's "low" number is primarily due to low employment in high-risk industries. However, it cannot be stressed enough that what is statistically unremarkable has a devastating impact on loved ones. One work-related death is one too many. [ download article only ] 

  • Examining Education, Incomes, and the "Skills Gap".  June 2015 (280K) Pg.1-3, 5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Assistant Director of Research, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    While the unemployment rate has dropped sharply over the past few years, it remains higher than it was before the "great recession" began. On the other hand, the number and rate of job openings are higher than their prerecession levels. In March, there were five million job openings nationally despite an unemployment rate of 5.4%, a percentage point higher than prevailed in 2006 and 2007. Despite the pool of unemployed job-seekers, some business groups report that their members are having difficulty hiring employees with the skills and experience they are seeking. This has led some to conclude that there is a gap between the skills available in the labor force and the needs of employers. [ download article only ] 

  • The Economic Impact of Tourism in Connecticut. May 2015 (367K) Pg.1-5
    Tourism Economics - Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development

    Tourism is an important economic engine in Connecticut, and all business sectors in the state economy benefit from tourism activity directly and/or indirectly. Visitors to Connecticut represent a significant economic benefit as they spend money in the local economy on items such as lodging, food and beverage, retail purchases, and recreation. Visitor spending has an even larger impact as it ripples through the statewide economy, generating revenues and jobs for businesses spanning a wide range of industries. Since the recession, Connecticut's tourism industry has created 5,000 new jobs. Visitors to Connecticut spent $8.3 billion in 2013, generating a total economic impact of $14.0 billion, supporting nearly 119,000 total jobs.[ download article only ] 

  • Connecticut's Work-Related Fatalities, 1992-2013.  December 2014 (433K) Pg.1-5
    By Erin C. Wilkins, Associate Research Analyst, Department of Labor, Erin.Wilkins@ct.gov

    "No one should have to sacrifice their life for their livelihood, because a nation built on the dignity of work must provide safe working conditions for its people." –Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez In 2013, work injuries claimed the lives of 4,405 workers in America. Twenty-six of those deaths occurred in Connecticut.

    Since 1992, the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics has conducted the annual Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) to document workplace fatalities. Connecticut averages 39 workrelated fatalities annually with a high of 57 in 1998. In 2013, Connecticut saw the lowest recorded number of 26 lost workers. This "low" number is not statistically notable and cannot be attributed to a specific cause. However, it cannot be stressed enough that what is statistically unremarkable has a devastating impact on loved ones. One workrelated death is one too many. As Dr. David Michaels, the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, states, "Making a living shouldn't have to cost you your life. Workplace fatalities, injuries, and illnesses are preventable. Safe jobs happen because employers make the choice to fulfill their responsibilities and protect their workers." [ download article only ] 

  • Long Term Industry and Occupational Projections: 2012-2022.  September 2014 (410K) Pg.1-5
    By Patrick J. Flaherty, Economist, Department of Labor, Patrick.Flaherty@ct.gov

    Every two years the Connecticut Department of Labor produces and publishes ten year projections by industry and occupation. This year's projections cover the period 2012-2022, which invites a comparison to the previous ten year period. The 2002-2012 period spans the global financial and economic crisis that caused the worst national recession since the Great Depression. While employment started to increase after the first quarter of 2010, by 2012 employment in many industries was still below 2002 levels. Importantly, the industries that grew the most after the recovery started were not necessarily the same as those that lost the most during the recession, so the industry and occupational mix of the economy has changed. The long term projections help put these changes into perspective and peek over the horizon to see what the industry and occupational profile of the economy would look like if full employment could be achieved within the next decade. [ download article only ] 

  • Part-time Employment Trends: An Update.  May 2014 (447K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    The Connecticut Economic Digest last tackled the topic of part-time employment in 1997. Therein it asked "are these newly created jobs mostly part-time (1 to 34 hours), with relatively low paying wages?" The tepid post-recession recovery we are currently experiencing has many people asking those same questions again. Fortunately, data availability has improved since the 1990s and this article will highlight state-level measures of earnings and hours worked to help answer those questions about the Connecticut economy. [ download article only ]  

  • Connecticut Migration Patterns.  August 2013 (418K) 4
    By Matthew Krzyzek, Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Examining interstate migration patterns provides an interesting view of where new Nutmeggers are coming from and where former Connecticut residents are going. Table 1 shows the ten largest sources of Connecticut inflow migration. The bordering states of New York and Massachusetts had the largest combined share of total inflow to the state at 39 percent of total inflows. Together with the third largest inflow state of Florida, those three states totaled 45 percent of flows into Connecticut. These three states since 2005 have consistently comprised the top three inflow origins to Connecticut. Overall inflow to the state in 2011 was 73,607 new residents. From 2005 through 2011 inflow peaked in 2006 at 88,518 new residents. [ download article only ]  

  • Youth Employment Patterns Revisited. September 2012  (198K) Pg.1-5
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    Last summer, the Connecticut Economic Digest published an article on youth employment in Connecticut. It used wage and Department of Motor Vehicles records to illustrate employment change by industry from the second to third quarter of 2007 and 2010. The article noted that youth employment declined at nearly three times the rate of overall Connecticut employment. This summer, the Census Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWI) dataset has been examined to provide a more detailed and longer-term analysis of labor market changes for youths in Connecticut. The analysis provides more detail as to how the recession has affected the state's youngest segment of the labor force and analyzes long-term trends that help indicate the direction we are heading a full 3 years into the NBER-declared recovery. [ download article only ]  

  • Youth Employment in Connecticut. July 2011  (419K) Pg.3
    By Matthew Krzyzek, CCT Economist, Department of Labor, Matthew.Krzyzek@ct.gov

    For many, summer is a time for relaxation. The season is typified by sunny weather, family vacations, barbeques and trips to the beach. However, the season also represents a young workers initiation into the labor force. Be it work as a camp counselor, lifeguard, salesperson or waitress, those summer jobs teach youths valuable skills they will carry with them onto enhanced employment opportunities later in life. Unfortunately, for a growing number of American youths, these jobs are increasingly hard to find. [ download article only ]  

  • A New Approach to Analyzing the Gender Wage Gap. April 2011  (185K) Pg.1-3,&5
    By Manisha Srivastava, Economist, Department of Labor, Manisha.Srivastava@ct.gov

    "Equal Pay Day" takes place on a Tuesday in April (April 12th this year), symbolizing how far into the workweek women must work to earn what men earned the previous week. The gender wage gap is calculated by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS), and is based on data collected through surveys. This article takes a new approach to understanding the gender wage gap using wage records from Connecticut's Unemployment Insurance (UI) program. The gender wage gap is analyzed by age group and in further detail for select industries, with interesting implications for policy makers. [ download article only ] 

  • A Closer Look at Worker Displacement. July 2000, (176K) Pg.3-4.

  • Baby Boomers - Drivers of Change. February 1999, (429K) Pg.1,4.

  • Fatal Work Injuries in 2007. October 2008, (410K) Pg.1-3.

  • Got Data? Information for Workforce Investment Planning - 2005. December 2005, (551K) Pg.5.

  • Mass Layoffs and the Business Cycle September 2009, (410K) Pg.1.

  • Mass Layoff Trends in Connecticut. September 2002, (268K) Pg.2.

  • Multiple Jobholding Trends. October 2001, (238K) Pg.1-3.

  • Older Workers and Their Earnings after a Mass Layoff December 2007, (569K) Pg.1-2, 5.

  • Occupational Injuries and Illnesses in 2000. May 2002, (203K) Pg.1-3.

  • Profiles of the Connecticut Workforce. July 2003, (192K) Pg.1-3.

  • Profiles of the workforce, 1986 and 1996. August 1998, (177K) Pg.1-4.

  • Steady Habits Uncovered in CT Private Worksite Data January 2008, (620K) Pg.1-2.

  • Union Membership Trends. April 2002, (228K) Pg.1-3.

top
Go Connecticut LMI Home State of Connecticut Department of Labor - Office of Research
200 Folly Brook Boulevard, Wethersfield, CT 06109 / Phone: 860-263-6275
LMI Home | CTDOL Home | CT.gov | Feedback | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Accessibility Policy
This workforce product was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration. (more)
Go to the State of Connecticut website