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Labor Market Information - State of Connecticut Labor Situation
  Labor Situation - State of Connecticut Last Updated: April 17, 2014
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current Connecticut Labor Situation - March 2014 PDF

Connecticut Nonfarm Employment...see more Unemployment Rates...see more New UI Claims...see more Consumer Price Index...see more

March nonfarm jobs increase 4,900, unemployment rate steady at 7.0%
WETHERSFIELD, April 17, 2014 - Connecticut added 4,900 total nonfarm jobs (0.3%) in March, further restoring positions lost in the extreme January deep freeze. The state has now added 9,400 jobs (0.6%) over the year. The March increase was enhanced by February’s upwardly revised increase (1,400, 0.1%) that was 600 jobs higher than originally reported. The state’s nonfarm employment growth rate appears to be returning to the moderate expansion pace experienced before the winter chill took hold at the start of the year.

The unemployment rate in the state for March was 7.0%, unchanged from February 2014, but down from the 7.8% rate determined a year ago. The statewide labor force estimate grew again in March (7,012, 0.4%), mostly on increased residential employment. The number of unemployed residents in the state increased slightly (396, 0.3%) in March 2014, but is down significantly (-15,918, -10.9%) since a year ago. This month’s unchanged rate of 7.0% ends a string of seven monthly declines in a row going back to July 2013 when the rate was 7.9%.

“March showed some solid signs of a return to previous job growth trends,” said Andy Condon, Director of the Office of Research. “These include the third month in a row of an expanding labor force and employment/population ratio, growing manufacturing employment, and positive movements in private-sector hours and earnings. Recovery trend employment growth appears to be returning following the volatile winter.”

Nonfarm Jobs: Preliminary nonfarm employment estimates for March show a strong 4,900 job gain (0.3%) which is helping Connecticut return to the moderate nonfarm employment growth trend that was apparent at the end of 2013. Since March 2013, the state has added 9,400 jobs (0.6%) for a total nonfarm employment level of 1,658,900. March’s monthly employment level has ascended through its three-month moving average, which is used to address monthly volatility.

Private-sector job growth in March (4,100, 0.3%) also added more jobs over-the-year (13,500, 1.0%) than total nonfarm employment. Government supersectors (800, 0.3%) added employment this March as well, but have remained a constraint on overall employment gains over the year (-4,100, -1.7%) and throughout the recovery. An additional 11,500 government supersector jobs have been lost since the recovery started in February 2010 (tribal casino employment on reservations is classified in local government and accounts for some of the weakness).

Recession Recovery: Connecticut has regained 65,000 positions, or 54.6% of the 119,100 seasonally adjusted total nonfarm jobs that were lost in the state during the March 2008 - February 2010 employment recession. Connecticut’s jobs recovery is now 49 months old and is averaging approximately 1,327 jobs per month overall since February 2010. The core private sector has recovered at a faster pace and has now gotten back 76,500 (68.3%, 1,561 per month) of the 112,000 private jobs that were lost during the same downturn. Now at 1,658,900 nonfarm jobs for March, the state needs to reach the 1,713,000 level to start a true nonfarm employment expansion. This will require an additional 54,100 jobs going forward.

Labor Market Areas (LMAs): March 2014 preliminary estimates show five of the six major Connecticut Labor Market Areas (Bureau of Labor Statistics recognized LMAs) posted nonfarm job gains, while the Norwich-New London LMA was just slightly lower (-100, -0.1%). Hartford (3,900, 0.7%), the largest LMA, led all in job growth magnitude in March after posting a large job loss last month. The Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk LMA (1,900, 0.5%) also was positive and the New Haven LMA (1,300, 0.5%) added jobs as well. The Danbury LMA (500, 0.7%) led just barely in percentage terms, and the Waterbury LMA (200, 0.3%) was higher as well. The Norwich-New London LMA continues to be the only BLS-recognized LMA to lose jobs over the year (-2,200, -1.7%). Note: The major Connecticut LMAs are estimated and seasonally adjusted independently from the statewide numbers by the BLS and cover about 90% of the nonfarm employment in the state, so they will not fully sum to the statewide total.

Hours and Earnings: The private sector workweek, not seasonally adjusted, averaged 33.6 hours in March 2014, up four-tenths of an hour from the year ago March 2013 figure of 33.2 hours. Average hourly earnings at $28.06, not seasonally adjusted, were up five cents, or 0.2% from the March 2013 hourly private sector pay estimate ($28.01). The resulting average private sector weekly pay was calculated at $942.82, up $12.89, or 1.4% over the year. The year-over-year gain in private sector hourly pay, weekly hours worked, and average weekly pay is a very positive development this month. The year-to-year change in the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U, U.S. City Average, not seasonally adjusted) in March 2014 was 1.5%. Information for the manufacturing production workweek and earnings can be found in the table section of this release under the “Hours and Earnings” data category.

Labor Market Information - Connecticut, Employment Sectors & United States Nonfarm Employment
Year to Year Month to Month Previous Three Months
Mar 2014 Mar 2013 Change Rate % Mar 2014 Feb 2014 Change Rate % Jan 2014 Dec 2013 Nov 2013
Graph Follow link below for more charts & data State of Connecticut Employment
go to Connecticut nonfarm employment data table Connecticut Nonfarm Employment 1,658,900 1,649,500 9,400 0.6% 1,658,900 1,654,000 4,900 0.3% 1,652,600 1,663,500 1,661,400
Graph Follow link below for more charts & data Goods Producing Industries
go to Construction sector data table Construction 56,000 53,200 2,800 5.3% 56,000 56,700 -700 -1.2% 55,400 55,400 55,200
go to Manufacturing sector data table Manufacturing 162,100 164,400 -2,300 -1.4% 162,100 161,700 400 0.2% 163,800 162,300 162,300
Graph Follow link below for more charts & data Service Providing Industries
go to Transportation and Public Utilities sector data table Transportation and Public Utilities 300,400 297,300 3,100 1.0% 300,400 298,400 2,000 0.7% 298,400 301,900 302,400
go to Information sector data table Information 31,600 32,100 -500 -1.6% 31,600 31,500 100 0.3% 31,400 31,300 31,500
go to Financial Activities sector data table Financial Activities 130,700 131,500 -800 -0.6% 130,700 130,000 700 0.5% 130,800 132,300 132,100
go to Professional and Business Services sector data table Professional and Business Services 203,900 203,300 600 0.3% 203,900 204,800 -900 -0.4% 202,900 205,500 205,600
go to Educational and Health Services sector data table Educational and Health Services 325,600 320,200 5,400 1.7% 325,600 325,600 0 0.0% 325,000 326,300 325,900
go to Leisure and Hospitality sector data table Leisure and Hospitality 151,800 146,300 5,500 3.8% 151,800 149,500 2,300 1.5% 148,000 150,600 149,400
go to Other Services sector data table Other Services 62,200 62,500 -300 -0.5% 62,200 62,000 200 0.3% 61,300 61,700 61,400
go to Government sector data table Government 234,000 238,100 -4,100 -1.7% 234,000 233,200 800 0.3% 235,100 235,600 235,000
Graph Follow link below for more charts & data United States Employment
go to United States nonfarm employment data table United States Nonfarm Employment 137,928,000 135,682,000 2,246,000 1.7% 137,928,000 137,736,000 192,000 0.1% 137,524,000 137,395,000 137,311,000

Seven industry supersectors gained jobs in March, while two supersectors were lower, and education and health services was unchanged. The seven growing supersectors in March were led by the leisure and hospitality (2,300, 1.5%) supersector.  There was very strong job growth from the restaurants and hotels component (2,200, 1.8%).  Trade, transportation, and utilities (2,000, 0.7%) also rebounded, with retail trade (1,700, 0.9%) providing much of the increase.  Again, the government supersector (800, 0.3%) added positions in March, led higher by state government (700, 1.1%).  Financial activities (700, 0.5%) posted an increase with both finance and insurance (600, 0.5%) and real estate (100, 0.5%) contributing to the gain.  Manufacturing entities were higher this month (400, 0.2%) as durables (200, 0.2%) and non-durables (200, 0.5%) production sectors both contributed.  Smaller job gains came from the other services (200, 0.3%) and the information (100, 0.3%) supersectors.

The two job losing supersectors were professional and business services (-900, -0.4%) and the combined construction and mining (-700, -1.2%) supersector.  Construction and mining had held up pretty well in the January-February freeze, but was lower this month.

 Labor Force / Residents Employed / Residents Unemployed Top
Connecticut’s unemployment rate was estimated at 7.0% for March 2014. This is unchanged from February, but down eight-tenths of a percentage point from the March 2013 unemployment rate of 7.8%. This month’s unchanged unemployment rate of 7.0% ends a string of seven monthly declines in a row since July 2013 when the rate was 7.9%. March’s statewide civilian labor force (7,012, 0.4%) grew again for the third month in a row. The unemployment rate in Connecticut has not been this low since it was 7.0% in January of 2009.
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Labor
Force
Resident
Emp.
Resident
Unemp.
Labor
Force
Resident
Emp.
Resident
Unemp.
Labor
Force
Resident
Emp.
Resident
Unemp.
Labor
Force
Resident
Emp.
Resident
Unemp.
Labor
Force
Resident
Emp.
Resident
Unemp.
Labor
Force
Resident
Emp.
Resident
Unemp.
Labor
Force
Resident
Emp.
Resident
Unemp.
Jan   1,863.4 1,770.9 92.5 1,888.5 1,755.8 132.8 1,904.8 1,731.3 173.6 1,917.4 1,738.5 178.8 1,895.3 1,740.4 154.9 1,873.3 1,723.8 149.4 1,852.2 1,719.3 132.9
Feb   1,864.4 1,771.6 92.8 1,891.4 1,752.1 139.4 1,909.5 1,734.2 175.3 1,917.1 1,740.2 176.8 1,893.6 1,740.3 153.3 1,870.5 1,722.7 147.7 1,857.9 1,727.7 130.2
Mar   1,865.4 1,771.7 93.7 1,894.6 1,749.2 145.3 1,913.4 1,737.1 176.3 1,915.6 1,740.8 174.8 1,892.6 1,739.2 153.3 1,868.1 1,721.6 146.5 1,864.9 1,734.3 130.6
Apr   1,866.9 1,771.2 95.7 1,897.4 1,747.2 150.2 1,915.9 1,739.2 176.7 1,912.6 1,739.6 173.0 1,891.3 1,736.5 154.8 1,866.3 1,720.5 145.8
May   1,869.1 1,770.4 98.7 1,899.5 1,745.4 154.2 1,917.0 1,739.9 177.1 1,908.9 1,736.9 172.0 1,889.7 1,732.6 157.1 1,864.5 1,718.6 145.9
Jun   1,872.0 1,769.6 102.4 1,900.6 1,743.4 157.3 1,917.1 1,739.5 177.6 1,905.6 1,734.1 171.4 1,888.0 1,728.8 159.2 1,862.3 1,716.0 146.3
Jul   1,875.1 1,769.2 106.0 1,900.6 1,740.9 159.6 1,916.8 1,738.3 178.6 1,903.4 1,732.6 170.8 1,886.4 1,726.0 160.3 1,859.7 1,713.3 146.4
Aug   1,878.2 1,769.0 109.2 1,899.6 1,738.1 161.5 1,916.8 1,737.1 179.7 1,902.3 1,732.9 169.4 1,884.8 1,724.9 159.9 1,856.8 1,711.3 145.5
Sep   1,880.8 1,768.6 112.3 1,898.5 1,735.0 163.4 1,916.8 1,736.2 180.7 1,901.7 1,734.7 167.1 1,883.3 1,725.0 158.3 1,853.7 1,710.1 143.5
Oct   1,882.9 1,767.0 115.8 1,897.8 1,732.1 165.7 1,917.1 1,735.8 181.3 1,901.1 1,737.0 164.1 1,881.6 1,725.5 156.0 1,850.6 1,709.5 141.1
Nov   1,884.6 1,764.2 120.4 1,898.4 1,730.1 168.3 1,917.3 1,736.0 181.3 1,899.7 1,738.9 160.8 1,879.2 1,725.6 153.6 1,847.9 1,709.2 138.7
Dec   1,886.4 1,760.2 126.2 1,900.7 1,729.7 171.1 1,917.3 1,736.9 180.4 1,897.5 1,739.9 157.6 1,876.3 1,724.9 151.4 1,845.8 1,709.4 136.4
 State of Connecticut Unemployment Rate vs. United States Unemployment Rate Top
Based on the household survey, the number of unemployed, seasonally adjusted, slightly increased by 396 (0.3%) over the month to 130,555 in March 2014. The state’s number of unemployed residents has declined by 15,918 (-10.9%) since March 2013. The March United States unemployment rate was 6.7%, unchanged from the February 2014 rate (6.7%), and lower by eight-tenths of a percentage point from the March 2013 rate, when it was estimated at 7.5%.

The March 2014 average weekly initial unemployment claims for first-time Connecticut filers (seasonally adjusted) increased over the month by 314 claims (8.3%) to 4,089, but were lower by 363 claims (-8.2%) from last March (4,452).

  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
CT U.S. Year-to-Year comparisons CT U.S. Year-to-Year comparisons CT U.S. Year-to-Year comparisons CT U.S. Year-to-Year comparisons CT U.S. Year-to-Year comparisons CT U.S. Year-to-Year comparisons CT U.S. Year-to-Year comparisons
Jan  5.0 5.0 0.0 7.0 7.8 0.8 9.1 9.7 0.6 9.3 9.1 -0.2 8.2 8.2 0.0 8.0 7.9 -0.1 7.2 6.6 -0.6
Feb  5.0 4.9 -0.1 7.4 8.3 0.9 9.2 9.8 0.6 9.2 9.0 -0.2 8.1 8.3 0.2 7.9 7.7 -0.2 7.0 6.7 -0.3
Mar  5.0 5.1 0.1 7.7 8.7 1.0 9.2 9.9 0.7 9.1 9.0 -0.1 8.1 8.2 0.1 7.8 7.5 -0.3 7.0 6.7 -0.3
Apr  5.1 5.0 -0.1 7.9 9.0 1.1 9.2 9.9 0.7 9.0 9.1 0.1 8.2 8.2 0.0 7.8 7.5 -0.3
May  5.3 5.4 0.1 8.1 9.4 1.3 9.2 9.6 0.4 9.0 9.0 0.0 8.3 8.2 -0.1 7.8 7.5 -0.3
Jun  5.5 5.6 0.1 8.3 9.5 1.2 9.3 9.4 0.1 9.0 9.1 0.1 8.4 8.2 -0.2 7.9 7.5 -0.4
Jul  5.7 5.8 0.1 8.4 9.5 1.1 9.3 9.5 0.2 9.0 9.0 0.0 8.5 8.2 -0.3 7.9 7.3 -0.6
Aug  5.8 6.1 0.3 8.5 9.6 1.1 9.4 9.5 0.1 8.9 9.0 0.1 8.5 8.1 -0.4 7.8 7.2 -0.6
Sep  6.0 6.1 0.1 8.6 9.8 1.2 9.4 9.5 0.1 8.8 9.0 0.2 8.4 7.8 -0.6 7.7 7.2 -0.5
Oct  6.2 6.5 0.3 8.7 10.0 1.3 9.5 9.5 0.0 8.6 8.8 0.2 8.3 7.8 -0.5 7.6 7.2 -0.4
Nov  6.4 6.8 0.4 8.9 9.9 1.0 9.5 9.8 0.3 8.5 8.6 0.1 8.2 7.8 -0.4 7.5 7.0 -0.5
Dec  6.7 7.3 0.6 9.0 9.9 0.9 9.4 9.4 0.0 8.3 8.5 0.2 8.1 7.9 -0.2 7.4 6.7 -0.7

The nonfarm employment estimate, derived from a survey of businesses, is a measure of jobs in the state; the unemployment rate, based on a household survey, is a measure of the work status of people who live in Connecticut. Overall, as the national and state economies recover, volatility in monthly numbers can be expected. Additionally, changes in methodology that culminated in March 2011 with the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics assuming complete responsibility for estimating all states’ monthly nonfarm job counts, have contributed to the month-to-month variability in the numbers. Jobs estimates are best understood in the context of their movement over several months rather than observed changes in a single month’s estimate.

Next Connecticut Labor Situation release: Thursday, May 15, 2014 (March 2014 data)

Go to the State of Connecticut website