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Labor Market Information - Connecticut, Employment Sectors & United States Nonfarm Employment
  State of Connecticut, Employment Sectors & United States Nonfarm Employment Last Updated: April 17, 2014
Initial nonfarm employment estimates for March reveal a strong 4,900 job gain (0.3%) which is helping Connecticut return to the moderate nonfarm employment growth trend that was apparent at the start of the year. Since March 2013, the state has added 9,400 jobs (0.6%) for a total nonfarm employment level of 1,658,900. Marchís monthly employment level has ascended through itsí three-month moving average, used to address short-term volatility, confirming that employment growth is returning after the extreme colder than normal winter weather.

The base private-sector (4,100, 0.3%) also strengthened in the state in March and has added more jobs over-the-year (13,500, 1.0%) than total nonfarm employment. Government supersectors (800, 0.3%) added employment this March as well but has remained a constraint on overall employment gains over-the-year (-4,100, -1.7%) and especially since the overall jobs recovery began. An additional 11,500 government supersector jobs have been lost since the recovery started in February 2010 (tribal casino employment on reservations is classified in local government and accounts for some of the weakness).

Labor Market Information - Connecticut, Employment Sectors & United States Nonfarm Employment
Year to Year Month to Month Previous Three Months
Mar 2014 Mar 2013 Change Rate % Mar 2014 Feb 2014 Change Rate % Jan 2014 Dec 2013 Nov 2013
Graph Follow link below for more charts & data State of Connecticut Employment
go to Connecticut nonfarm employment data table Connecticut Nonfarm Employment 1,658,900 1,649,500 9,400 0.6% 1,658,900 1,654,000 4,900 0.3% 1,652,600 1,663,500 1,661,400
Graph Follow link below for more charts & data Goods Producing Industries
go to Construction sector data table Construction 56,000 53,200 2,800 5.3% 56,000 56,700 -700 -1.2% 55,400 55,400 55,200
go to Manufacturing sector data table Manufacturing 162,100 164,400 -2,300 -1.4% 162,100 161,700 400 0.2% 163,800 162,300 162,300
Graph Follow link below for more charts & data Service Providing Industries
go to Transportation and Public Utilities sector data table Transportation and Public Utilities 300,400 297,300 3,100 1.0% 300,400 298,400 2,000 0.7% 298,400 301,900 302,400
go to Information sector data table Information 31,600 32,100 -500 -1.6% 31,600 31,500 100 0.3% 31,400 31,300 31,500
go to Financial Activities sector data table Financial Activities 130,700 131,500 -800 -0.6% 130,700 130,000 700 0.5% 130,800 132,300 132,100
go to Professional and Business Services sector data table Professional and Business Services 203,900 203,300 600 0.3% 203,900 204,800 -900 -0.4% 202,900 205,500 205,600
go to Educational and Health Services sector data table Educational and Health Services 325,600 320,200 5,400 1.7% 325,600 325,600 0 0.0% 325,000 326,300 325,900
go to Leisure and Hospitality sector data table Leisure and Hospitality 151,800 146,300 5,500 3.8% 151,800 149,500 2,300 1.5% 148,000 150,600 149,400
go to Other Services sector data table Other Services 62,200 62,500 -300 -0.5% 62,200 62,000 200 0.3% 61,300 61,700 61,400
go to Government sector data table Government 234,000 238,100 -4,100 -1.7% 234,000 233,200 800 0.3% 235,100 235,600 235,000
Graph Follow link below for more charts & data United States Employment
go to United States nonfarm employment data table United States Nonfarm Employment 137,928,000 135,682,000 2,246,000 1.7% 137,928,000 137,736,000 192,000 0.1% 137,524,000 137,395,000 137,311,000

Seven industry supersectors gained jobs in March, while two supersectors were lower, and education and health services was unchanged.The seven growing supersectors in March were led by the leisure and hospitality (2,300, 1.5%) supersector. There was very strong job growth from the restaurants and hotels component (2,200, 1.8%).Trade, transportation, and utilities (2,000, 0.7%) also rebounded, with retail trade (1,700, 0.9%) providing much of the increase.Again, the government supersector (800, 0.3%) added positions in March, led higher by state government (700, 1.1%).Financial activities (700, 0.5%) posted an increase with both finance and insurance (600, 0.5%) and real estate (100, 0.5%) contributing to the gain.Manufacturing entities were higher this month (400, 0.2%) as durables (200, 0.2%) and non-durables (200, 0.5%) production sectors both contributed.Smaller job gains came from the other services (200, 0.3%) and the information (100, 0.3%) supersectors.

The two job losing supersectors were professional and business services (-900, -0.4%) and the combined construction and mining (-700, -1.2%) supersector.Construction and mining had held up pretty well in the January-February freeze, but was lower this month.

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