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Anesthesiologist Assistants Go Back to List
Assist anesthesiologists in the administration of anesthesia for surgical and non-surgical procedures. Monitor patient status and provide patient care during surgical treatment.
 Tools & Technology
 Tools used in this occupation:
 
  • Blood coagulation multiple parameter monitor or meter
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  • Automated external defibrillators AED or hard paddles
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  • Electronic blood pressure units
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  • Mercury blood pressure units
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  • Central venous pressure CVP manometer
  •  Technology used in this occupation:
     
  • Medical software
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  • Word processing software
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  • Spreadsheet software
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  • Office suite software
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  • Electronic mail software
  •  Tasks
     
  • Verify availability of operating room supplies, medications, and gases.
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  • Provide clinical instruction, supervision or training to staff in areas such as anesthesia practices.
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  • Collect samples or specimens for diagnostic testing.
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  • Participate in seminars, workshops, or other professional activities to keep abreast of developments in anesthesiology.
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  • Collect and document patients' pre-anesthetic health histories.
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  • Provide airway management interventions including tracheal intubation, fiber optics, or ventilary support.
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  • Respond to emergency situations by providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), basic cardiac life support (BLS), advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), or pediatric advanced life support (PALS).
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  • Monitor and document patients' progress during post-anesthesia period.
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  • Pretest and calibrate anesthesia delivery systems and monitors.
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  • Assist anesthesiologists in monitoring of patients, including electrocardiogram (EKG), direct arterial pressure, central venous pressure, arterial blood gas, hematocrit, or routine measurement of temperature, respiration, blood pressure or heart rate.
  •  Skills
     
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
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  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
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  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
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  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
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  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
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  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
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  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
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  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
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  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
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  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  •  Knowledge
     
  • Medicine and Dentistry - Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
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  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
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  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal m
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  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
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  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
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  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
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  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
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  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
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  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
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  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
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     Education & Training
      Education:   Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).
      Related Experience:   Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialized medical training to be able to do their job.
      View Related Programs on Connecticut's Education & Training ConneCTion site.
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     Wage Information
     
    Region Average Entry Level  Mid-Range 
    Annual  Hourly 
    Statewide $118,144.00 $56.80  $45.67  $49.82 - $63.81 
    Bridgeport/Stamford $116,848.00 $56.18  $44.98  $50.49 - $63.45 
    Danbury $122,438.00 $58.86  $44.94  $49.66 - $70.93 
    Hartford $117,932.00 $56.70  $46.36  $49.56 - $62.92 
    New Haven $117,557.00 $56.52  $47.50  $50.78 - $62.76 
    New London/Norwich $109,588.00 $52.69  $41.25  $43.42 - $59.77 
    Waterbury $126,205.00 $60.68  $47.87  $51.08 - $72.66 
    Torrington $117,152.00 $56.32  $53.29  $53.91 - $61.63 
     Occupation Outlook ( 2014 - 2024 )
    Average Annual Job Openings:   82
      Employment in this occupation is expected to grow much faster than average, and the number of annual openings will offer excellent job opportunities.
    ONET Resource Center Some of the occupational information on this page is formulated from O*NETTM v17.0 data. O*NETTM is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
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