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Hydrologists Go Back to List
Research the distribution, circulation, and physical properties of underground and surface waters; and study the form and intensity of precipitation, its rate of infiltration into the soil, movement through the earth, and its return to the ocean and atmosphere.
 Tools & Technology
 Tools used in this occupation:
 
  • Well logging downhole test equipment
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  • Surface data logging sensors
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  • Surface data logging units
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  • Commercial fishing nets
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  • Levels
  •  Technology used in this occupation:
     
  • Analytical or scientific software
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  • Data base user interface and query software
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  • Computer aided design CAD software
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  • Map creation software
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  • Graphics or photo imaging software
  •  Tasks
     
  • Study and document quantities, distribution, disposition, and development of underground and surface waters.
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  • Coordinate and supervise the work of professional and technical staff, including research assistants, technologists, and technicians.
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  • Prepare hydrogeologic evaluations of known or suspected hazardous waste sites and land treatment and feedlot facilities.
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  • Design and conduct scientific hydrogeological investigations to ensure that accurate and appropriate information is available for use in water resource management decisions.
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  • Study public water supply issues, including flood and drought risks, water quality, wastewater, and impacts on wetland habitats.
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  • Collect and analyze water samples as part of field investigations or to validate data from automatic monitors.
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  • Apply research findings to help minimize the environmental impacts of pollution, waterborne diseases, erosion, and sedimentation.
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  • Measure and graph phenomena such as lake levels, stream flows, and changes in water volumes.
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  • Investigate complaints or conflicts related to the alteration of public waters, gathering information, recommending alternatives, informing participants of progress, and preparing draft orders.
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  • Answer questions and provide technical assistance and information to contractors or the public regarding issues such as well drilling, code requirements, hydrology, and geology.
  •  Skills
     
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
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  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
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  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
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  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
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  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
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  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.
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  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
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  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
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  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
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  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  •  Knowledge
     
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
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  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
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  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
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  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
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  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal m
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  • Geography - Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
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  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
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  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
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  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
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  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
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     Education & Training
      Education:   Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
      Related Experience:   A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.
      View Related Programs on Connecticut's Education & Training ConneCTion site.
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     Wage Information
     
    Region Average Entry Level  Mid-Range 
    Annual  Hourly 
    Statewide $94,489.00 $45.43  $34.06  $37.73 - $54.45 
    Hartford $97,213.00 $46.73  $35.56  $39.27 - $55.96 
    ONET Resource Center Some of the occupational information on this page is formulated from O*NETTM v17.0 data. O*NETTM is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
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