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Geneticists Go Back to List
Research and study the inheritance of traits at the molecular, organism or population level. May evaluate or treat patients with genetic disorders.
 Tools & Technology
 Tools used in this occupation:
 
  • Electron guns
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  • Instrumentation for capillary electrophoresis
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  • Gel documentation systems
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  • Rapid amplification or complementary deoxyribonucleic acid ends RACE technology products
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  • Binocular light compound microscopes
  •  Technology used in this occupation:
     
  • Analytical or scientific software
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  • Object or component oriented development software
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  • Data base user interface and query software
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  • Operating system software
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  • Internet browser software
  •  Tasks
     
  • Write grants and papers or attend fundraising events to seek research funds.
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  • Verify that cytogenetic, molecular genetic, and related equipment and instrumentation is maintained in working condition to ensure accuracy and quality of experimental results.
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  • Plan curatorial programs for species collections that include acquisition, distribution, maintenance, or regeneration.
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  • Participate in the development of endangered species breeding programs or species survival plans.
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  • Maintain laboratory safety programs and train personnel in laboratory safety techniques.
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  • Instruct medical students, graduate students, or others in methods or procedures for diagnosis and management of genetic disorders.
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  • Evaluate, diagnose, or treat genetic diseases.
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  • Design and maintain genetics computer databases.
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  • Confer with information technology specialists to develop computer applications for genetic data analysis.
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  • Collaborate with biologists and other professionals to conduct appropriate genetic and biochemical analyses.
  •  Skills
     
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
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  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
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  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
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  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
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  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
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  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
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  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
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  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
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  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
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  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  •  Knowledge
     
  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
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  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
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  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
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  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
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  • Medicine and Dentistry - Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
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  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
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  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
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  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal m
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  • Personnel and Human Resources - Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.
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  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
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     Education & Training
      Education:   Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).
      Related Experience:   Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialized medical training to be able to do their job.
      View Related Programs on Connecticut's Education & Training ConneCTion site.
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     Wage Information
     
    Region Average Entry Level  Mid-Range 
    Annual  Hourly 
    Statewide $94,286.00 $45.33  $33.31  $37.02 - $52.24 
    Hartford $89,605.00 $43.08  $33.79  $37.45 - $49.41 
    New Haven $82,964.00 $39.89  $28.05  $29.67 - $45.19 
    ONET Resource Center Some of the occupational information on this page is formulated from O*NETTM v17.0 data. O*NETTM is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
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