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Microbiologists Go Back to List
Investigate the growth, structure, development, and other characteristics of microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, algae, or fungi. Includes medical microbiologists who study the relationship between organisms and disease or the effects of antibiotics on microorganisms.
 Tools & Technology
 Tools used in this occupation:
 
  • Gas generators
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  • Ultraviolet UV lamps
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  • Homogenizers
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  • French pressure cells
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  • Gas burners
  •  Technology used in this occupation:
     
  • Analytical or scientific software
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  • Data base user interface and query software
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  • Medical software
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  • Word processing software
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  • Internet browser software
  •  Tasks
     
  • Examine physiological, morphological, and cultural characteristics, using microscope, to identify and classify microorganisms in human, water, and food specimens.
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  • Provide laboratory services for health departments, for community environmental health programs, and for physicians needing information for diagnosis and treatment.
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  • Observe action of microorganisms upon living tissues of plants, higher animals, and other microorganisms, and on dead organic matter.
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  • Investigate the relationship between organisms and disease, including the control of epidemics and the effects of antibiotics on microorganisms.
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  • Supervise biological technologists and technicians and other scientists.
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  • Study growth, structure, development, and general characteristics of bacteria and other microorganisms to understand their relationship to human, plant, and animal health.
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  • Prepare technical reports and recommendations based upon research outcomes.
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  • Study the structure and function of human, animal, and plant tissues, cells, pathogens and toxins.
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  • Use a variety of specialized equipment such as electron microscopes, gas chromatographs and high pressure liquid chromatographs, electrophoresis units, thermocyclers, fluorescence activated cell sorters and phosphorimagers.
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  • Conduct chemical analyses of substances such as acids, alcohols, and enzymes.
  •  Skills
     
  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
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  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
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  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
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  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
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  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
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  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
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  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
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  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
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  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
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  • Learning Strategies - Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
  •  Knowledge
     
  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
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  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
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  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal m
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  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
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  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
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  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
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  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
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  • Medicine and Dentistry - Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
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  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
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  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
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     Education & Training
      Education:   Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).
      Related Experience:   Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialized medical training to be able to do their job.
      View Related Programs on Connecticut's Education & Training ConneCTion site.
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     Wage Information
     
    Region Average Entry Level  Mid-Range 
    Annual  Hourly 
    Statewide $77,558.00 $37.29  $26.59  $28.01 - $38.59 
    Bridgeport/Stamford $89,345.00 $42.96  $28.99  $36.41 - $52.96 
    Hartford $76,525.00 $36.79  $25.86  $28.30 - $44.00 
    New Haven $125,871.00 $60.52  $33.57  $40.84 - $68.44 
    ONET Resource Center Some of the occupational information on this page is formulated from O*NETTM v17.0 data. O*NETTM is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
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