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Food Scientists and Technologists Go Back to List
Use chemistry, microbiology, engineering, and other sciences to study the principles underlying the processing and deterioration of foods; analyze food content to determine levels of vitamins, fat, sugar, and protein; discover new food sources; research ways to make processed foods safe, palatable, and healthful; and apply food science knowledge to determine best ways to process, package, preserve, store, and distribute food.
 Tools & Technology
 Tools used in this occupation:
 
  • Packaging vacuum
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  • Filling machinery
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  • Dehydrating machinery
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  • Crushing machinery
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  • Blanching machinery
  •  Technology used in this occupation:
     
  • Analytical or scientific software
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  • Data base user interface and query software
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  • Spreadsheet software
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  • Presentation software
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  • Office suite software
  •  Tasks
     
  • Test new products for flavor, texture, color, nutritional content, and adherence to government and industry standards.
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  • Check raw ingredients for maturity or stability for processing and finished products for safety, quality, and nutritional value.
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  • Confer with process engineers, plant operators, flavor experts, and packaging and marketing specialists to resolve problems in product development.
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  • Evaluate food processing and storage operations and assist in the development of quality assurance programs for such operations.
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  • Study methods to improve aspects of foods, such as chemical composition, flavor, color, texture, nutritional value, and convenience.
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  • Study the structure and composition of food or the changes foods undergo in storage and processing.
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  • Develop new or improved ways of preserving, processing, packaging, storing, and delivering foods, using knowledge of chemistry, microbiology, and other sciences.
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  • Develop food standards and production specifications, safety and sanitary regulations, and waste management and water supply specifications.
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  • Demonstrate products to clients.
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  • Inspect food processing areas to ensure compliance with government regulations and standards for sanitation, safety, quality, and waste management standards.
  •  Skills
     
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
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  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
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  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
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  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
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  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
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  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
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  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
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  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
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  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
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  • Systems Analysis - Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
  •  Knowledge
     
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
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  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal m
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  • Food Production - Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.
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  • Biology - Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
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  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
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  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
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  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
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  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
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  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
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  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
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     Education & Training
      Education:   Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
      Related Experience:   A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.
      View Related Programs on Connecticut's Education & Training ConneCTion site.
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     Wage Information
     
    Region Average Entry Level  Mid-Range 
    Annual  Hourly 
    Statewide $68,951.00 $33.15  $21.85  $23.36 - $38.49 
    ONET Resource Center Some of the occupational information on this page is formulated from O*NETTM v17.0 data. O*NETTM is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
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